March 15 Wednesday, Mar 21 2012 

Paris Grocery News
March 15th, 2012

We got a lot of new products in over the last week, so come in to check them all out! I could only pick out a few favorites to share this week though. Without further ado:

 

Chateau Haut-Mongeat Graves de Vayres Blanc 2010

40% Semillon, 40% Muscadelle, 20% Sauvignon Blanc. Light gold in color, this delicious blend is fresh and lively with a palate-cleansing, racy acidity and bright, ripe fruit. The bouquet is highly aromatic with abundant notes of apple, pear, pineapple, and flowers. Drink it as an aperitif or serve with almost any seafood, pork, or chicken. Excellent with spicy dishes! $10.99

Chateau D’Arlay NV Macvin du Jura Rouge

A wine-geek’s wine, Macvin expands our understanding of wine in general and is a fascinating, adventurous treat. One third brandy and two thirds Pinot Noir grape must, this Macvin is held 4 years in casks and one year in old oak before being released. The result is curious, rich, layered dessert wine with plenty of spice. It reveals huge intensity along with some sweetness and glycerin from its red liqueur, with some slight peppermint notes as well. 95 points, Wine Advocate $21.99 350 ml

Tirecul la Graviere Monbazillac 2007 Les Pins

“Tirecul la Graviere is recognized as the top property of the [Monbazillac] AOC. The fame of Chateau Tirecul la Graviere has spread far and wide over the last several years. Most notably, Robert Parker has awarded the property two 100 point scores and compared it with Sauterne’s Chateau d’Yquem. With good acidity and a solid backbone, these wines can last for decades, a rarity in wines from this area of Southwest France. These wines are magical, defining examples of the best that Monbazillac can offer. 80% Semillon, 20% Muscadelle botrytized grapes grown in chalky soil, seeing some French oak. $19.99 500 ml

2009 La Granacha Vielles Vignes

The 2009 La Granacha is made from 100% old vine Grenache (some parcels are nearly 100 years old). Also aged in tank before being bottled unfined and unfiltered, this is the most powerful La Granacha yet made, tipping the scales at nearly 16% natural alcohol. The belief that such a powerful wine can not also be elegant is disproved by the precise, fresh, lively kirsch liqueur notes intermixed with tobacco leaf, loamy soil, and forest floor characteristics. This delicious, deep ruby/plum-colored, round, generous, glycerin-filled wine can be enjoyed over the next several years. 90 points Wine Advocate $14.99

2010 Andezon Cotes du Rhone

The classic cuvee, which has long been selected by importer Eric Solomon, is their 2010 Domaine d’Andezon, a blend of 90% Syrah and 10% Grenache. While there are critics of Syrah grown in the southern Rhone, even the cynics agree that the old-vine Syrah from the Gard has a special character to it. This wine comes from 40+-year-old Syrah vines and 60+-year-old Grenache vines, bottled unfined and unfiltered after being aged in both tank and concrete. Dense ruby/purple, with a stunning nose of blackberry liqueur and jus de viande (beef/meat juices), its thrilling, intensely pure, full-bodied mouthfeel, good freshness, and striking floral character all combine for one of the very best bargains in dry red wine that readers are likely to find anywhere in the world. 91 points Wine Advocate $14.99

2010 Domaine de Fees

The newest cuvee is from a single estate, located just to the west of Lirac, called Domaine des Fees. Bottled separately, there are 1,000 cases for the US market and this blend of equal parts Grenache and Syrah, aged completely in concrete tanks, is stunning. Gorgeous notes of roasted meats, Provencal herbs, sweet black cherry liqueur, and licorice as well as spice jump from the glass of this dense, ruby/purple-tinged wine. Fresh, full-bodied and juicy, with a velvety texture, it is a beauty that would be best drunk over the next 3-4 years. Think of it as a Chateauneuf du Pape wearing a Cotes du Rhone mask.90 points Wine Advocate 

$14.99

Cheeses

 

Brillat Savarin

Nirvana on a cracker! One of the most decadent cheeses you will ever eat, Brillat Savarin aux truffles is named after the so-called “Father of Modern Cooking.” The decadently creamy texture and milky flavor of this fresh cheese pairs beautifully with the earthy and aromatic black truffles. Definitely a cheese to share with friends! Try it with buttery crackers for a savory snack or paired with fruit for an over-the-top dessert. $46.99

Montealva

Montealva is a semi-soft pastuerized goat cheese form Cadiz. Like Amercian goat cheeses Montealva is creamy, but has more of a moist chalky texture on the pallete. The mild slightly piquant goat tang translates into vibrant lemon tones and a lasting citrus finish. $20.99

Dark Chocolate Fondue with Fleur de Sel

This charming chocolate fondue is a mixture of 70% dark chocolate and fleur de sel, adding a little kick to a favorite dessert. The ceramic cup is microwaveable, or it can be heated in a double broiler. Either way, use it to dip your favorite fruits and cookies and see what a little fleur de sel adds to a sweet treat! $22.99

We’ve always loved and carried Traou Mad de Pont Aven cookies from Brittany. Made with salted butter, these thick biscuits are supremely dunk-worthy. But in honor of the Gauguin exhibit at the Seattle Art Museum, we’ve brought in these adorable Gauguin tins of cookies. Stop by the Paris Grocery after seeing the masterpieces and pick up a tasty souvenir! $13.99 each

Pan Ducale Bastoncini Biscotti-Cantuccini. I opened these biscotti today for purely scientific purposes, and half the box was gone by noon. The same fate befell all the biscotti pictured above. Seriously addicting, these biscotti have the right balance of crunch and crumble to hold up by themselves or go with your morning coffee. Available in almond or chocolate-hazelnut. $6.24 each.

 

For the latest Paris Grocery news and musings, join us on Facebook! Archives of this newsletter and other articles can be found on our blog.

Thanks for reading, and we’ll see you in the shop!

Ellen

and
Steve Winston and Sharon Baden
Owners, Paris Grocery

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A taste of Morocco Wednesday, Jan 25 2012 

Paris Grocery News
January 25th, 2011

Have you missed us?We hope you all survived the great snow storm of 2012 and have been keeping warm. It’s certainly a time for hot food and good company. With the holidays past, I’ve had most of my ‘home favorites’ and am ready to branch out and try something new. It’s a new year, and time for explorations! This week, I headed to North Africa for inspiration and am attempting to cook a Chicken Bastilla

Warm, flakey pastry filled with the unorthodox but outstanding combination of chicken (traditionally pigeon but who has time to go pigeon trapping these days?), blanched almonds($7.99/lb), Moroccan spices, orange blossom water ($5.99) and powdered sugar. Warca, also known as Feuille de Brique ($4.29), is the secret to the puffed, airy layers that bring a lightness to the otherwise extremely rich, nutty and spicy dish. !

For lunch, pair the Bastilla with our new signature Paris Grocery Moroccan mint tea ~$2.00/16 oz

For dinner, pair it with the 2009 Alain Graillot Syrocco ‘Zenata’ $19.99

This 100% Syrah possesses lots of soft, jammy, berry fruit, licorice, pepper and meaty notes. Tasty, plump, and altogether hedonistic, this wine is ideal for drinking over the next several years.

Of course, we’ve got to rave about a few more wine at PG this week, as long as we’ve got your ear:

2010 Cercius Cotes du Rhone Vielles Vignes $15.99

“Wow, is this an exciting wine! A custom cuvee put together by importer Eric Solomon along with the brilliant oenologist Philippe Cambie and Costieres de Nimes’ up-and-coming superstar, Michel Gassier, this blend of 85% Grenache and 15% Syrah (and there are 5,000 cases for the US) comes from the 70- to 80-year-old Grenache vines on the plateau of Domazan to the south of Chateauneuf du Pape. This sensational wine tastes more like Chateauneuf du Pape than just about any Cotes du Rhone one is likely to find. It is also another example of what looks to be another great vintage emerging from the southern Rhone – 2010. This is one of the greatest Cotes du Rhones I have ever tasted – wonderfully intense, deep ruby with some purple tinges, with a stunning nose of black raspberry liqueur intermixed with sweet cherries, licorice, pepper and Provencal lavender. Round, generous, opulent and heady, this fabulously intense, hedonistic wine should be drunk over the next 3-4 years. Bravo!” 93 points Wine Advocate

Georges Duboef Macon-Villages Chardonnay 2009 $9.99

This 100% chardonnay from Burgundy is un-oaked, making it fresh and floral with a beautiful nose. bright fruits are balanced by almond and a minerality that carries the lengthy finish. It’s a real treat at this price.

 

For the latest Paris Grocery news and musings, join us on Facebook! Archives of this newsletter and other articles can be found on our blog.

Thanks for reading, stay warm, and we’ll see you in the shop!

Ellen

and
Steve Winston and Sharon Baden
Owners, Paris Grocery

September 23rd Sunday, Sep 25 2011 

Paris Grocery News
September 23, 2011
September 25th is our two year anniversary, can you believe it? To those of you who have been with us from the start, a special thank you! It’s also an exciting week because we just received our copy of Food and Wine Magazine for October 2011, and the Paris Grocery is featured on a national list of best places to buy French wine. Check us out on page 106. To celebrate both occasions, we’re transitioning from our summer rosé six pack special to a fall red six pack. Take a tour through France with this grab-and-go six pack, and keep our Paris grocery reusable wine tote bag as a souvenir! Six tasty reds include wines from Bordeaux, Rhone, Cahors, and the Loire Valley, with a selection of different varietals. It’s a great way to jump-start the fall season and try some new wines! $58.00 includes sales tax.

 

Also this week we were nearly overwhelmed with two huge shipments, mainly of the glorious meaty and cheesy variety.

 

Take a long look at the brilliant, decadent little amuse-bouches above. Sweet, dark prunes soaked in armagnac (a distinctive brandy from gascony) and stuffed with foie gras. They’re called french kisses, and are a total knock-out. With such intense sultry flavor, these are the perfect size to get a mouthful that lingers on the palate. $15.49 for a set of six or $2.99 each.

Uncured Smoked Duck Bacon.

Yes, it’s back! a fresh batch of duck bacon. Made from moulard duck breast, this unique bacon can be enjoyed on its own for breakfast, or can be used to enhance other dishes. Try it on a salad, in a pasta, with haricot vert, or any other place you would normally use bacon to bring a richer flavor to the table. Or for a muskier, wilder flavor, try our wild boar bacon! duck bacon-$16.49, wild boar bacon- $9.49.

Foie Gras Mousse

Buttery texture, sumptuous flavor, this foie gras is perfectly fatty and perfectly fresh. light and creamy with a hint of good Sauternes wine added to the baked terrine to enhance the luxurious taste of the foie gras .Whether you want to spread it on baguette or, as many chefs are doing these days, try pan frying it, you’re in for a real treat.

But we’ll save some meats to talk about next week. In the meantime, we have two amazing cheese specials. We accidently ordered too much of two great soft cheeses, so we’re pricing them to move quickly. Our mistake is your windfall!

Purple Haze Cyprus Grove Chevre (left)

This is a beautiful soft goat’s cheese from California. The unexpected marriage of lavender and wild fennel pollen distinguishes Purple Haze and makes it utterly addictive. Delicate and sophisticated, this cheese is the winner of Best of Show, California State Fair Cheese Competition, 2009 and Best of Class, U.S. Cheese Championship 2011. I’ve eaten two of them already. You won’t find a price like this anywhere else. $1.99
Smoked Mozzarella (right)

The smoky outer layers of this cheese peel back to a sweet, soft center. This is a great little cheese for snacking on, and is perfect for kids or others who don’t appreciate your pungent gooey bleus or camembert. Melt it over mushrooms or asparagus for a perfect pairing of earthy and smoky flavors. Again, a steal at just $1.99!

Thank you for reading and we’ll see you in the shop!

Ellen

Colonial influences on French flavor, September 9th Friday, Sep 9 2011 

Paris Grocery News

September 9, 2011

French culture is often prized for its unique characteristics, and for centuries it has been a pinnacle of style and taste. While the influence of French culture cannot be overstated, part of that wonderful je ne se quoi comes from the influence of other cultures upon the French. From Viet Nam to Tunisia, Morocco to Algiers, the French Empire adopted and was influenced by aspects of each of the peoples it colonized. The result is an incredibly rich and varied french palate, a mosaic culture full of nuance and surprise. This week, we pay homage to the fantastic diversity of French culture by showcasing a few of our products that are undeniably French, yet undeniably exotic.

click on the picture for some information/inspiration!

Feuille de brick

Just in this week, we have White Toque Feuille de brick, ‘the finest and crispiest of them all’. Originally from Tunisia, brick pastry dough is impossibly light and flaky, and used for both sweet and savory appetizers and desserts, baked or fried. There are 10 sheets (12″ diameter) in each frozen package, so keep some around for the next time you entertain. They’re a real crowd pleaser. $4.49

Red Boat Fish Sauce

At least once a week we get a call asking if we carry Red Boat Fish Sauce. It’s simply the best fish sauce on the market, an essential ingredient in Vietnamese cooking. Western chefs have embraced fish sauce as a go-to ingredient that draws out a dish’s own flavors and adds a special complexity of taste. Red Boat is an artisan fish sauce that has had people raving. Read up on it here, or here, then come in and try some for yourself! 250 ml bottles are $4.99

Le Souk Tagines

Ghille Basan defines the Tagine as a ‘stew worthy of poetry’ in his book on the subject (which we do carry for $15.99). Tagines are truly an art, and are a meal inseparable from the beautiful container they are made in and served from. The conical shape allows steam to circulate inside during cooking, preserving tender flavors. We sell a few different styles of Tagine, so whether you’re a beginner or a professional you can appreciate the succulent and aromatic spice of Morrocco. From Le Souk we carry clay cooking tagines in small and large sizes, as well as hand painted ceramic serving tagines that are drop-dead gorgeous. $40.00-$60.00

Emile Henry Tagines

But for the true marriage of French and North African cooking, no Tagine can compare with Emile Henry’s Poterie Culinaire. The Burgundy Clay that Emile Henry uses is slowly disperses heat, can be put on direct flame, under a broiler, in the microwave and in the dishwasher. Emile Henry offers the highest quality products, and they guarantee their Tagines with a limited 10 year warranty. A beautiful investment or gift for someone who loves to cook. We have them in two sizes and four colors. $126.00

And of course, the drinks (As a side note, today’s ‘french phrase’ from our one-a-day calendar is “ça l’aide à se détendre” or ‘it helps him to relax’. We thought it was appropriate)!

2009 Domaine Olivier Hillaire Chateauneuf-du-pape $55.00

Bright ruby. Spicy strawberry and raspberry aromas are lifted by a floral element and a hint of black tea. Fresh and precise, accented by silky texture and good breadth. Finishes firm and persistent, with attractive fruit and a slight dryness. this 2009 Chateauneuf du Pape has outstanding depth of dark fruit, and will be perfect to drink starting in November. What a wonderful investment for the holiday season.

2009 Cercius Cotes du Rhone Villages $16.99

The 2009 Cercius red, a Visan Cotes du Rhone-Villages, is composed of 85% Grenache and 15% Syrah. It represents a naked expression of Cotes du Rhone as it is aged completely in concrete prior to bottling. This medium to full-bodied wine possesses a deep ruby/purple color in addition to copious black currant and black cherry fruit interwoven with graphite, crushed rocks, and spice, excellent fruit intensity, a full-bodied mouthfeel, good acidity, and light tannins. It should drink nicely for 3-4 years.

Clos Normand Brut French Fermented Cider $6.99

If you’ve ever been curious about French Cider, Clos Normand is a great introduction. If you’re already a fan, than Clos Normand is an old favorite. With crisp red apple notes and a hint of fresh bread, this is an inviting and uncomplicated cider sure to please just about anyone.

For the latest Paris Grocery news and musings, join us on Facebook!

Thanks for reading, see you soon!
Ellen

and
Steve Winston and Sharon Baden
Owners, Paris Grocery
A wine and cheese shop with a french mood

1418 Western Ave
Seattle, WA 98101
206.682.0679

Monday-Saturday
10 to 6
Sunday
11 to 5

Paris Grocery News 8/6 Saturday, Aug 6 2011 

This is my last newsletter for Paris Grocery. I’d like to say thanks to all of you who came into the shop (sometimes with color printouts of the newsletter, ready to use as a shopping list) and said nice things about the writing. It was always really pleasing to hear that you liked it. To say goodbye, I’m going to feature my all-time favorite things here in the shop. You can bet I’ll be stocking up before I leave.

Thanks for being such fun customers, and bon appétit,

Rachel

Will always be in style, will never break: the Picardie salad bowl.

Duralex “Picardie” Salad Bowl

I love this stuff, especially the iconic Picardie tumblers, which to me represent the Platonic ideal of a glass. We carry the tumblers in four sizes, and we also have ramekins, bowls, and plates. Before I leave today, I’m picking up the salad bowl (only $9!) for all my summer salads and for a never-break mixing bowl.

Trust me, these are delicious.

Dolin Vermouth de Chambéry

The only Vermouth that has earned an AOC designation. Dolin has none of the cloying sweetness or overly bitter qualities found in bottom-shelf Vermouths. The particular mixture of plants found near Chambéry give a fresh, restrained, and elegant nose with a subtle, complex, and bittersweet palate. I love this on its own with ice and a hefty piece of lemon peel, but it’s also great in cocktails. $13.99

André Neveu “Le Grand Fricambault” Sancerre Rosé 2010

André Neveu’s vineyards are located in Chavignol, on the silex soil of Sancerre’s hillsides. This exquisite, highly aromatic pinot noir rosé reflects this flinty terrain. Light yet concentrated, it exudes aromas of fresh strawberries and offers unbelievable minerality. While any day of the week, you might find me sipping any one of our incredibly tasty value roses, this is the one I’d really like to treat myself to. $24.99

Alpha Loire Domaines “Sables Blonds” Touraine Rouge 2009

This 100% Cabernet Franc is loaded with minerals and notes of earth and dark berries. It’s juicy and lightly tannic, making it ideal for a range of dishes, from pizza to vegetable tarts to flank steak. This is one versatile red, and is a great entry level choice for those wanting to try out cab francs. $9.99

Domaine Pierre Sparr Marquis de Perlade

Made in the traditional method, this sparkling wine is a blend of Pinot Blanc, Chenin Blanc, Macabeu and Chardonnay from the wonderful Alsatian producer Pierre Sparr. Crisp, with lovely notes of green apple and a touch of honey and toast, this sparkling wine complements a big sweet and savory spreads, such as charcuterie, cheese platters, fruit, and nuts. While working here, this became my go-to festive sparkler, so now when I taste it, it reminds me of Christmas, birthdays, and raucous brunches with friends. $9.99

Lovely boxes, amazing teas.

Kusmi Tea

This stuff is so good! FloFab recently sang its praises, noting its beginnings as “the tea of the czars in 1867 in St. Petersburg.” Kusmi is now based in Paris, and its lovely black tea blends, often scented with flowers, citrus, or vanilla, have many fans. The packaging is really pretty, and each box comes with 20 muslin tea bags for $15.99 In stock now:

  • Russian Morning: a classic breakfast blend of China, Ceylon, and India teas.
  • Prince Vladimir: a Russian-style blend of China black teas with lemon, grapefruit, and spices.
  • Anastasia (as in, the princess): Earl Grey with lemon, lime, and bergamot.

Tarragon, Walnut, and Piment d'Espelette.

Mustards!

Oh, yes. Mustard sells like crazy here at the shop, because it is delicious. My favorites are Edmond Fallot Tarragon Dijon (awesomely vivid green and excellent with meats, vegetables, or in potato salad) and Walnut Dijon (so good on ham and cheese sandwiches). A new item that I’ve been enjoying is the Parfum des Oliviers Mustard à la L’Ancienne au Coulis de Piment d’Espelette (grain-style mustard with Basque pepper). It adds texture and spices to meats. Vive la moutarde!

You can look forward to future newsletters and updates from the rest of the staff of Paris Grocery and the Spanish Table!

Thanks for reading,

Rachel

and

Steve Winston and Sharon Baden

Owners, Paris Grocery

Paris Grocery News 7/11 Monday, Jul 11 2011 

No sleep til Brooklyn! (Because they're on a sugar high from these awesome syrups.)

New @ PG

Fancy syrups, hearty salami, and a texture-driven sweet: our new favorite things.

Florence Fabricant’s “Food Stuff” column in the New York Times is starting to get downright creepy. Every piece is either about some lovely product we just bought, or some new product we’d be stupid not to get. Thus: Royal Rose syrups! Handcrafted in Brooklyn, these organic syrups beautify cocktails, sodas, and desserts. Available in rose, lavender-lemon, cardamom-clove, and three chiles. Because we will do anything that FloFab tells us to do. $11.99 ($10.99 for the three chiles.)

Our love affair with Zoe’s Meats continues. Just in time for summer, we’ve brought in their Genovese salami. It’s a slightly larger diameter salami that’s completely nitrite free with a lean pork-to-fat ratio. Made with pinot grigio (rather than the sweeter sherry wine that they use in their house salami), its milder, juicier flavor makes for a great picnic salami that will go well with a varied spread. $21.99/lb

Share if you must.

Stroopwafels! (We really like saying that.) These incredible Dutch cookies are also referred to as “butter syrup waffles” (!) or “honey syrup waffles.” What they are: A gooey layer of buttery honey goodness smooshed between two chewy waffle cookies. Some people will say they are a little too sweet. Step slowly away from such people while concealing the bag of stroopwafels behind your back. They’re yours now. $5.39

Wine @ PG

Taking a break from our rosé obsession. (But omg there are so many good ones in the shop right now you have to come buy rosé!)

Yep, we're still buying great whites and reds.

Vignobles Fontan Domaine de Maubet 2010

Gascony whites never fail to please. This blend of Colombard, Ugni Blanc, Gros Manseng, and Sauvignon blanc is refreshing without being too acidic. Tropical fruit on the nose, and an interesting note of grassiness on the finish. The screw-top bottle makes this one picnic-friendly. $8.99

Domaine A. et P. De Villaine Bouzeron 2009

For a perhaps more elegant get-together. This wine is made with Aligoté doré, a regional varietal that makes for versatile and aromatic wines. We love this Bouzeron; it’s crisp and lean with earthy, stony notes. It’s got a ton of finesse and understated earthiness. Excellent as an apéritif, and would pair well with seafood or a plate of cheeses. $26.99

Château Mazeau Bordeaux 2009

For those who still crave a deep red during the summer, we’ve brought in this nice quaffer from Bordeaux. Juicy red fruit flavors that deepen on the palate into a lingering, dry finish. Notes of licorice, coffee, and tobacco (oh, yeah). Can’t go wrong with price, either: $9.99

Thanks for reading, see you soon!
Rachel

and
Steve Winston and Sharon Baden
Owners, Paris Grocery

Paris Grocery News 5/7 Saturday, May 7 2011 

Consider a box of unique cookies for Mom. Fossier's Biscuits Roses are best when dunked in Champagne, which is so fancy it's almost unbearable.

Gifts @ PG

We love Mother’s Day; it’s a chance to celebrate any mother or mother-figure in your life. We’ve got so many gifts and sweets and snacks that would make a terrific gift for Mom, it’s ridiculous.

Until a shop in Seattle makes decent macarons, consider making your own!

I Heart Macarons by Hisako Ogita is full of charming, colorful pictures as well as specific technical instruction for making macarons. Our book section is bursting with cookbooks, France-located fiction, and wish-fulfillment nonfiction about living in France.

Everyone needs tiny footed dishes.

Victoriana Noir Footed Dishes by Rosanna are great for mustard, chocolates, or spare change. We also carry teapots, plates, and mugs from this local designer who specializes in sophisticated whimsy.

We’d also be glad to help you put together a collection of sweet and savory foodstuffs: jams, mustards, olives, vinegars, cookies, and more. Happy Mother’s Day!

Wines @ PG

A rebel's last yell, my favorite pink, and an exceptional Cab Franc.

2010 Marcel Lapierre Raisins Gaulois Gamay

Marcel Lapierre was a renowned producer of Beaujolais wines, and his death last year marked a sad end to a vivacious man and a tireless advocate for biodynamic production and non-interventionist winemaking. He was one of the “Gang of Four” rebel winemakers in Beaujolais, a group of vitners dedicated to making natural, delicious wines and bucking convention and appellation when necessary. Despite his disregard for the system, Marcel was one of the most respected producers in France. His Raisins Gaulois Gamay is absolutely charming, grapey, and fresh, with spicy black cherry notes and a little dustiness. Though not an “official” Beaujolais, it shows how great these light-hearted wines can be. We’ve brought in three cases of this delicious wine—it’s not to be missed!

2010 Domaine de Fontsainte Corbières Gris de Gris

This remains one of my absolute favorite rosés, over several vintages. It’s a unique “Gris de Gris” that’s made from both Grenache Noir and Grenache Gris, along with a few other southern French varietals. Bruno Laboucarié show the same care with his rosé as with his red wine, harvesting by hand and pressing whole clusters of grapes to preserve their delicate aromas. Incredibly fresh, with zippy strawberry notes and superb minerality. This will make a superb accompaniment to olives, grilled shrimp, and other savory snacks common in Corbières. Bring on the sunshine!

2009 Catherine & Pierre Breton Chinon

Imported by Kermit Lynch, who knows a thing or two about funky, interesting wines. We’re big fans of this producer, as well—their unique, terroir-driven wines are a hit on the bistro scene in Paris. This Cabernet Franc is full of dark fruit and savory, olive notes, with mostly smooth tannins. Check out what Kermit Lynch had to say about the Bretons.

Thanks for reading, see you soon!
Rachel

and
Steve Winston and Sharon Baden
Owners, Paris Grocery

Paris Grocery News 4/9 Saturday, Apr 9 2011 

Three new reds from smaller, up-and-coming appellations. (Hint: that means terrific wines for cheap.)

Wine @ PG

Georges Duboeuf  Morgon Jean Descombes 2009

Sorry to keep beating the “OMG vintage of a lifetime” drum regarding the 2009 Beaujolais vintage but: Here’s yet another delicious example at a pretty incredible price. We’re all really loving wines from Morgon lately, too. “Light tannins and a smoky mineral note frame this lush red, which displays layers of black cherry, raspberry ganache, and tea rose flavors. There’s a spicy thread running through the wine, leading to a fresh, firm finish. 93 points.”  —Wine Spectator ($14.99)

Domaine Les Aphillanthes Vin de Pays de Vaucluse 2009

This lovely and light-bodied red features a good mix of cherry, cherry pit, and red licorice notes with a juicy finish. Wines from the small area of Vaucluse (located in Provence, on the border of the Rhône) are smart little table wines; many top producers from border areas have been buying parcels of land there so they can have more freedom to experiment with other varietals or biodynamic techniques. This one’s refreshing enough to sip as an aperitif, but also stands up to a game day meal of roasted chicken and frites. 86 points Wine Spectator ($11.99)

Château de L’Estang Côtes de Castillon 2004

Jefe couldn’t believe the fantastic value that this Bordeaux presented; he bought a whole case (we have really smart wine reps). This blend of Merlot and Cabernet Franc comes from an up-and-coming appellation on the right bank of the Dordogne river east of Saint Emilion. Pleasing berry and mineral notes, and a price you can’t beat! ($9.99)

Food @ PG

Oh, Canada.

Just in from Nova Scotia: Wild Caught Boned Salted Cod ($15.99/1 lb box). Here’s a recipe for brandade that was originally printed in the New York Times for Passover.

Brandade de Morue

By Alex Witchel; adapted from Nicholas Lemann

Time: 40 minutes

Yield: About 3 cups.

1 whole head garlic

1 1/2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil, more as needed

2 Idaho or other starchy potatoes, peeled

1 pound boned dried salt cod, soaked according to package directions, or pre-soaked salt cod

1 onion, peeled and quartered

2 cups whole milk, or as needed

2 large eggs

Salt and freshly ground black pepper

1/4 cup finely chopped parsley

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Place garlic on a square of foil, rub with 1/2 tablespoon olive oil to coat it, and wrap securely in foil. Roast until cloves are soft, about 30 minutes. Allow to cool, remove cloves from their skins, then mash cloves with a fork.

2. While garlic roasts, prepare potatoes and cod: Place potatoes in a saucepan, cover with water, and boil until tender, about 20 minutes. Place cod in a saucepan, add onion, and barely cover with milk. Place over medium-low heat and simmer until cod flakes easily, 15 to 20 minutes. Remove cod with a slotted spoon, transferring it to a plate to cool; leave milk at a very low simmer.

3. Drain potatoes; remove onion from milk and discard. Return potatoes to pot and mash them. Immediately and quickly break eggs into hot potatoes and stir vigorously until fully incorporated. Beat in 2 or 3 tablespoons simmering milk until mixture is very thick and smooth. Add one tablespoon olive oil, or as desired, for flavor and texture. Add garlic (it may not all be needed) and salt and pepper to taste.

4. Shred cooled cod as finely as possible, and add to potato mixture. Adjust milk, oil, garlic and salt and pepper as desired. Add parsley and mix well. Mound in a shallow serving bowl or on a platter. Serve at room temperature with toasty baguette or peasant bread, if desired.

We’re now packing out olives to order from our deli case, so you can get just as much as you need.

Black Olives with Herbs

These oil-cured black olives with herbes de provence have a dense texture and a full, earthy flavor. So savory—I think they’re the perfect olive to have with aperitifs.

French Country Olive Mix

A colorful blend of green, pink, and black olives, as well as lupini beans and bell peppers, are tossed in a lively marinade of spices, pepper, and vinegar. Perfect alongside antipasto plates and a cold Belgian beer!

Thanks for reading, see you soon!
Rachel

and
Steve Winston and Sharon Baden
Owners, Paris Grocery

Paris Grocery News 3/18 Friday, Mar 18 2011 

 

(Serving Suggestion.)

Sweets @ PG

Yet another bonanza of goodies, just arrived from France. (We’ve got the excess of packing peanuts to prove it.)

Fig and Walnut Caramels

Some insane trifecta of deliciousness is achieved here with this combination of caramel, fig, and walnut. They’re so earthy and sweet and chewy and crunchy, all at the same time, that you’ll feel deeply satisfied with even just one. (But you better get a few, you know, for later.) (79¢)

Calissons

A traditional treat from Aix-en-Provence. A chewy paste of almonds, sugar, and Cavaillon melon with a touch of orange rind and just the right amount of royal icing. (99¢)

Chocolate Truffles

Supremely creamy dark chocolate truffles, dusted with cocoa powder. Yep. The gold-foil packaging is pretty great, too. (60¢)

Les Confitures à l’Ancienne Drinking Chocolate

This amazing drinking chocolate made with raw cane sugar and the finest cocoa beans won the NASFT Outstanding Beverage Award in 2002. With undertones of fruitiness and natural vanilla, this mix makes a mean cup of hot cocoa. (75¢/sachet or $14.49 cube of 14 sachets*)

*The cube was mistakenly priced at $5.99 and listed as such in the newsletter; $14.49 is the correct price. Sorry for any confusion!)

Marshmallow Ropes

Do like the cool enfants and eat these adorable marshmallow ropes right out of the package! Or cut them into comically large squares and float them in a bowl of drinking chocolate. Pick your favorite flavor: lemon, raspberry, or violet. ($1.99)

Dunk 'em.

And: cookies!

Biscoff

The demand for speculoos spread continues apace here at the shop, so we thought it wise to bring in the original cinnamon-stoked cookies as well. These are a Flanders tradition, known stateside for being served on Delta flights. Make a cup of coffee and sit back like you’re flying Delta first class, unless that sounds awful, in which case think about how you’re enjoying the cookies without having to go through the hassle of air travel. ($3.99)

Fossier Biscuits Roses

These airy yet hardy biscuits from Reims, near Champagne, are infused with a touch of vanilla and dressed with a coat of powdered sugar. They’re meant to be dunked, in anything from milk or tea to wine, an aperitif, or even a glass of Champagne, which is so charming we just can’t stand it. Also, the Fossier website offers recipe ideas for tower-like cakes using the cookies like Jenga pieces that are quite ornate and ladies-who-lunch. ($6.99)

Gavottes Crispy Crepe Dentelles

These biscuits from Brittany are made of many many crispy layers, wound around each other like “the dance that lends them their name.” (A gavotte was, obviously, a Breton dance involving lots of spinning and twirling). Available in regular flaky goodness, as well as with milk or dark chocolate coating. ($4.99)

Wine @ PG

Newest of the new.

This just in! (As in, I just put these new wines on the shelf five minutes ago.)

Domaine Força Réal Côtes du Roussillon Villages 2005 ($8.99)

Crazy good price. This medium-bodied southern red has some intense rusticity, with notes of graphite and dark fruit. A good quaffer, especially with something particularly meaty or savory.

Enclos du Petit Chien Cheverny Blanc 2009 ($12.99)

Another fantastic value from the Loire Valley. This 90% Sauvignon Blanc, 10% Chardonnay is, to quote Sharon, “yummy.” Expressions of herbs and minerals, and a nicely round creaminess in the mouth, revealing that the seemingly tiny edition of Chardonnay makes for an excellently balanced quencher.

Domaine des Braves Régnié 2009 ($14.99)

This 100% Gamay from Régnié, the most recently recognized cru of Beaujolais (1988), starts out with some residual sugar and floral hints of violet, but then deepens into dark berry notes and a smooth, refreshing minerality. We’ve noted the exceptional quality of Beaujolais wines from this vintage, and this one is no exception.

Thanks for reading, see you soon!
Rachel

and
Steve Winston and Sharon Baden
Owners, Paris Grocery

Paris Grocery News 3/12 Saturday, Mar 12 2011 

Do goat cheeses taste better when topped with a cute label? Answer: No (but it doesn't hurt).

Cheese @ PG

A goat cheese with a bit of age and a few washed rind cheeses with a bit of funk.

Crottin Frais du Périgord

These tiny drums of barely aged goat’s milk cheese come from Périgord, a region of Bordeaux known for its goat cheese delicacies. A soft and creamy texture, with a nutty flavor. Fantastic when heated and placed on salads or toasts. $1.99/each or 2/$3

Oh, you monks.

Le Poteaupré

This oozy washed rind cow’s milk cheese was created by the Trappist monks of the Chimay Abbey in Belgium. Intensly earthy, with flavors of wild mushroom, toasted hazelnuts, and a finish that resembles buttered popcorn. Pair with a Chimay or a fruity red. $15.99/lb

Les Frères

Don’t you love it when siblings play nicely? Semi-soft washed rind cheese created by the Crave Brothers in Waterloo, Wisconson. This mild American cow’s milk cheese is earthy and pleasant with flavors of sea salt and bitter herbs.  Pair with white wine or sparkling. $15.99/lb

Trois Laits

Another stunning cheese from affineur Pascal Beillevaire. This Pyrenees washed rind cheese has the creaminess of cow’s milk, the nuttiness of sheep’s milk, and the subtle herbaceous tang of goat’s milk. Rich, complex, and beefy, with notes of Alpine grasses, marjoram, and sage. $32.99/lb

Wine @ PG

It's still cold; we still prefer warmth.

So, we may have gotten ahead of ourselves with talk of rosé season and patios. Here’s a few more delightful reds to keep you warm for this last bit (please?) of drizzly winter.

Domaine Astruc  Vin de Pays de L’Hérault Vielles Vignes Carignan 2008

Smoky aromas. Round on the mid-palate, with supple and balanced tannins. Minerals and spice, with a note of bitter chocolate on the finish. ($9.99)

Chateau Jouanin Bordeaux 2009

Explosive and full-bodied, this 90% Merlot and 10% Cabernet Franc is aged for 15 months in new and used oak. Flavors of menthol, eucalyptus, and juicy red and black fruits. ($12.99)

Domaine de Nalys Châteauneuf-du-Pape 2007

Delicious, with loads of minerals and plenty of length. 80% Grenache and 20% Syrah. 92 points: Stephen Tanzer, Wine Advocate. ($43)

Craves @ PG

Just think of all the Manhattans you could make.

Les Parisiennes griottines

A customer favorite. These delicious Morello cherries have been pitted and prepared in a Kirsch liqueur. Griottines are famous throughout the world for their freshness and refined taste. And the grand, Belle Epoque packaging is simply too much. Add to desserts, aperitifs, and cocktails. ($24.99/18.5oz jar)

Feed Your Mind @ PG

Called "the poet of the appetites" by John Updike.

We’ve brought in a range of titles from the luminous American gourmand, Mary Frances Kennedy Fisher (thankfully known as M.F.K. Fisher).  Corny, but: she’s a personal hero of mine. Consider this quote from “The Gastronomical Me” (emphasis mine):

“People ask me: Why do you write about food, and eating and drinking? Why don’t you write about the struggle for power and security, and about love, the way others do. They ask it accusingly, as if I were somehow gross, unfaithful to the honor of my craft. The easiest answer is to say that, like most humans, I am hungry. But there is more than that. It seems to me that our three basic needs, for food and security and love are so mixed and mingled and entwined that we cannot straightly think of one without the others. So it happens that when I write of hunger, I am really writing about love and the hunger for it, and warmth and the love of it and the hunger for it.”

In stock (all are necessary):

Consider the Oyster

The Gastronomical Me

An Alphabet For Gourmets

How to Cook A Wolf

As They Were

Two Towns in Provence

Long Ago In France: The Years in Dijon

Sister Age

 

Thanks for reading, see you soon!
Rachel

and
Steve Winston and Sharon Baden
Owners, Paris Grocery

 

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