Paris Grocery News 3/18 Friday, Mar 18 2011 

 

(Serving Suggestion.)

Sweets @ PG

Yet another bonanza of goodies, just arrived from France. (We’ve got the excess of packing peanuts to prove it.)

Fig and Walnut Caramels

Some insane trifecta of deliciousness is achieved here with this combination of caramel, fig, and walnut. They’re so earthy and sweet and chewy and crunchy, all at the same time, that you’ll feel deeply satisfied with even just one. (But you better get a few, you know, for later.) (79¢)

Calissons

A traditional treat from Aix-en-Provence. A chewy paste of almonds, sugar, and Cavaillon melon with a touch of orange rind and just the right amount of royal icing. (99¢)

Chocolate Truffles

Supremely creamy dark chocolate truffles, dusted with cocoa powder. Yep. The gold-foil packaging is pretty great, too. (60¢)

Les Confitures à l’Ancienne Drinking Chocolate

This amazing drinking chocolate made with raw cane sugar and the finest cocoa beans won the NASFT Outstanding Beverage Award in 2002. With undertones of fruitiness and natural vanilla, this mix makes a mean cup of hot cocoa. (75¢/sachet or $14.49 cube of 14 sachets*)

*The cube was mistakenly priced at $5.99 and listed as such in the newsletter; $14.49 is the correct price. Sorry for any confusion!)

Marshmallow Ropes

Do like the cool enfants and eat these adorable marshmallow ropes right out of the package! Or cut them into comically large squares and float them in a bowl of drinking chocolate. Pick your favorite flavor: lemon, raspberry, or violet. ($1.99)

Dunk 'em.

And: cookies!

Biscoff

The demand for speculoos spread continues apace here at the shop, so we thought it wise to bring in the original cinnamon-stoked cookies as well. These are a Flanders tradition, known stateside for being served on Delta flights. Make a cup of coffee and sit back like you’re flying Delta first class, unless that sounds awful, in which case think about how you’re enjoying the cookies without having to go through the hassle of air travel. ($3.99)

Fossier Biscuits Roses

These airy yet hardy biscuits from Reims, near Champagne, are infused with a touch of vanilla and dressed with a coat of powdered sugar. They’re meant to be dunked, in anything from milk or tea to wine, an aperitif, or even a glass of Champagne, which is so charming we just can’t stand it. Also, the Fossier website offers recipe ideas for tower-like cakes using the cookies like Jenga pieces that are quite ornate and ladies-who-lunch. ($6.99)

Gavottes Crispy Crepe Dentelles

These biscuits from Brittany are made of many many crispy layers, wound around each other like “the dance that lends them their name.” (A gavotte was, obviously, a Breton dance involving lots of spinning and twirling). Available in regular flaky goodness, as well as with milk or dark chocolate coating. ($4.99)

Wine @ PG

Newest of the new.

This just in! (As in, I just put these new wines on the shelf five minutes ago.)

Domaine Força Réal Côtes du Roussillon Villages 2005 ($8.99)

Crazy good price. This medium-bodied southern red has some intense rusticity, with notes of graphite and dark fruit. A good quaffer, especially with something particularly meaty or savory.

Enclos du Petit Chien Cheverny Blanc 2009 ($12.99)

Another fantastic value from the Loire Valley. This 90% Sauvignon Blanc, 10% Chardonnay is, to quote Sharon, “yummy.” Expressions of herbs and minerals, and a nicely round creaminess in the mouth, revealing that the seemingly tiny edition of Chardonnay makes for an excellently balanced quencher.

Domaine des Braves Régnié 2009 ($14.99)

This 100% Gamay from Régnié, the most recently recognized cru of Beaujolais (1988), starts out with some residual sugar and floral hints of violet, but then deepens into dark berry notes and a smooth, refreshing minerality. We’ve noted the exceptional quality of Beaujolais wines from this vintage, and this one is no exception.

Thanks for reading, see you soon!
Rachel

and
Steve Winston and Sharon Baden
Owners, Paris Grocery

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Paris Grocery News 2/20 Sunday, Feb 20 2011 

 

Good fonts on the outside, good chai on the inside.

Hot Drinks @ PG

This past Saturday, we were joined by Jillu Zaveri, founder of Seattle-based company Jaipur Avenue, for a chai tea tasting. Thanks to Jillu and her husband for spending time with us, and thanks to our customers for coming by. Lots of chai went out the door, and we’re looking forward to your feedback. Jaipur Avenue makes all-natural, just-add-water chai tea mixes; we sampled Original Masala (a perfect balance of spices), Saffron (exotically sweet), and Cardamon (earthy and fully spicy). These flavors, as well as Ginger and Vanilla, are now available at the shop. The packaging is particularly pretty, and fortunately the product inside lives up to the outside appearance. You may be asking yourself, why chai? Well, why not? It’s delicious, it’s local, we’re cold, it’s warm. Also, George insists that chai tea is all the rage in Paris (note: George has not been to Paris). While he may be making that up, it wouldn’t surprise me. Parisians, for all their sometimes stodgy (yet charming) reverence for their own culture, are a truly metropolitan and increasingly global bunch. And this will continue to be our explanation for the funny things we like to buy for the shop that aren’t strictly French, including Linghams Malaysian hot sauce, Les Moulins Mahjoubs Tunisian olive oil, Finnska Finnish licorice, and now Jaipur Avenue Indian-by-way-of-Seattle chai tea.

Wine @ PG

 

Cheap, cheap, not-as-cheap.

Two closeout deals on full-bodied, easy-drinking rosés, and Sharon’s new favorite red.

Abel Clement Rhone Rosé 2009 ($8.99)

Fresh and light on the palate, with notes of wild strawberry and a touch of spice. 80% Grenache and 20% Syrah. The perfect wine to enjoy during the ever-increasing daylight hours.

Mas Carlot Costières de Nîmes Rosé 2009 ($8.99)

A more fruit-forward style, with a good amount of body and a clean finish. Stands up to dishes with plenty of flavor and spice; try it with ratatouille or Mexican food. 60% Grenache and 40% Syrah.

Domaine Charvet Moulin-à-Vent “La Réserve d’Amélie” 2009 ($18.99)

Sharon tasted this by the glass at nearby Lecosho, and came back raving about it. It’s her new favorite wine (this week, at least). This is the only wine we carry from this up-and-coming cru of Beaujolais that produces very fine and full-bodied iterations of the Gamay grape. Juicy, dark fruits and a hint of earth.

Thanks for reading, see you soon!

Rachel

and
Steve Winston and Sharon Baden
Owners, Paris Grocery

Paris Grocery News 11/21 Sunday, Nov 21 2010 

(Serving Suggestion.)

Wine @ PG

Here’s a recommended lineup of wines for the Thanksgiving meal, from bubbly to white to red. And there are so many more amazing options here at the shop: cremants, rosés, Burgundy, Bordeaux, dessert wines, and more.

Stephane Coquillette “Carte d’Or” Brut Champagne ($47)

This delicious Champagne is comprised of 60 % Pinot Noir and 40% Chardonnay grapes, which are culled from the Grand Crus and Premier Crus of the harvest. Exhibits amazing complexity with notes of melon, berries, toast, and buttered brioche. A persistent finish and fine bubbles: a divine way to start off your feast!

2009 Frédéric Gueguen Petite Chablis ($16.99)

What a delicious wine! Very characteristic of what a Chablis should be: crisp, clean, and elegant. Aromas of tart green apples, toasted almonds, grass and a touch of minerality. This wine pairs well with a wide range of foods, making it our choice for an outstanding Thanksgiving white wine.

2009 Marcel Lapierre Morgon ($24.99)

Marcel Lapierre was a renowned producer of Beaujolais wines, and his death this year marks a sad end to a vivacious man and a tireless advocate for biodynamic production and non-interventionist winemaking. His beloved Gamay grape gets its full expression in this vintage: Exuberant strawberry and red raspberry threaded with lilac, striking notes of blood orange rind, nutmeg, toasted pecan, blond tobacco, and subtle hints of game and forest floor. Silken in texture, sappy and pungent, this finishes with an exhilaratingly animated exchange of fruit, flower, and mineral elements and a sense of levity rare for its vintage.” 93 points Robert Parker

Meat @ PG

 

Pâté de Campagne

Pâté Provençal

Coarse yet spreadable, this pork pâté has bits of green olives and red pepper throughout. Flavorful, with plenty of herbs and spices. $14.99/lb

Pâté de Campagne

This country-style pork spread is coarsely textured and generously seasoned with black pepper. We like seeing who gets the carrot slice on top! $15.99/lb

Mousse Basquaise

Inspired by Basque flavors. Made with duck liver, roasted red bell peppers, and port wine. A bit of spice breaks up the creaminess of the mousse. $16.99/lb

Truffle Mousse

A delectable combination of chicken liver, truffles, and sherry. Savor with baguette and either a light Beaujolais or a sweet Sauternes. $18.99/lb

Duck Mousse with Port Wine

A savory, spreadable mousse made with duck liver, port wine, and spices. No artificial ingredients. Delicious! $20.99/lb

Goose Mousse Supreme

Made with goose and duck liver, and Sauternes. Set in aspic with oranges. One of our most popular mousses, this one is truly indulgent. $25.99/lb

And this just in: Fois Gras Mousse from D’Artagnan!

Craves @ PG

Syrups.

It’s the season of syrups. The distillation of fruit, flowers, or nuts into sugary liquid form, making everything sweeter and therefore better. We’ve got some fantastic options for adding flavor to your hot drinks, cocktails, whipped cream, and sweet treats. We have a wide range of Monin syrups, including grenadine, almond, caramel, and peppermint. Try maple spice or pumpkin spice to make a flavored whipped cream for pies and tarts. We also love L’Épicerie de Provence syrups. Cassis works for making celebratory Kir Royale cocktails, and we recommend Violet, Lavender or Chocolate Hazelnut in baked goods and candies.

Gifted @ PG

Le Souk Ceramique.

These brightly colored ceramics from Tunisia are all made and painted by hand. 100 percent food safe, and appropriate for use in the dishwasher and microwave. Above is the “Sauvage” pattern; we have over 6 patterns available in bowls, plates, mugs, teapots, and more. A beautiful tradition of craft making continues!

Thanks for reading, see you soon!
Rachel

and
Steve Winston and Sharon Baden
Owners, Paris Grocery

Beaujolais Lingo Saturday, May 8 2010 

We featured several Beaujolais wines a few weeks ago, and as I was preparing the newsletter, I realized there were several terms that might sound a little foreign. (Well, they are foreign.) So here’s a little Beaujolais primer to help you navigate the wines of this alluring region.

Beaujolais (bow-jo-lay)

A region just south of Burgundy, between Lyon and Mâcon. Known for clay and limestone soils, with pockets of gravel. Primary grapes grown are: Gamay (red) and Chardonnay, with a little bit of Pinot Noir and Burgogne Aligoté grown as well. This region is known for using a fermentation technique called carbonic maceration (see below) that creates light, fruity wines that are low in tannins.

Carbonic Maceration

A special kind of fermentation. Rather than pressing the grapes and adding yeast to ferment the grape sugars into ethanol (alcohol), wine makers place whole clusters of grapes in closed fermentation tanks that are infused with carbon dioxide. The carbon dioxide penetrates the grapes and starts an intracellular fermentation within each single. Enzymes in the grape pulp convert the sugar into ethanol, thus fermenting the juice while it is still inside the grape skin. This process creates certain flavor compounds along with the alcohol, and as the juice has minimal contact with the grape skins, the resulting wine is lighter colored and lower in tannins.

Beaujolais Nouveau
Perhaps the most famous category of Beaujolais, this style emphasizes the flavors created by carbonic maceration and sometimes retains a small amount of dissolved CO2. The quick fermentation is followed by immediate bottling. The very light, fruity wines are released to the market on the third Thursday of November.

Beaujolais-Villages
A wine from any one (or combination) of 33 villages recognized for their quality soil and climate.

Cru Beaujolais
A Cru Beaujolais is a wine that comes from one of the ten designated Cru Villages (Morgon, Fleurie, Julienas, Moulin-à-Vent, St. Amour, Chénas, Brouilly, Côte de Brouilly, Chiroubles, and Régnié). These are considered the best vineyard locations, and often have plantings that are 50-100+ yearsThe name of the village will be listed on the label.