Friday, Dec 12 2014 

Paris Grocery seattle

December 4, 2014

Bonjour Mes Amis,

We’re really starting to get in the holiday spirit around here. My tree is up & ready to be trimmed. Did you enjoy the snow? I still have some in my back yard.

The turkeys were such a success that I am going to offer more for Christmas dinners, as well as Goose, yes goose! This is a very French tradition. See below for all the pre-order details…

A Bientot,
Catherine Reynolds

A TRADITIONAL FRENCH CHRISTMAS DINNER
Reserve your goose now, & they will be available for pick up starting December 19th. Here’s an incredible recipe for Roast Goose from the Red Lion Inn, which I visited many times in my youth. I just require credit card information to order one, birds will be charged when you pick up.

Frozen turkeys are also available–email me for details at Catherine@spanishtable.com

Nicky Farms Air-chilled Goose
$11.99 approximately 12 lbs each
Available for pick up beginning Dec 19th

CHICKEN WITH MUSTARD from My Paris Kitchen by David Leibowitz 
I’ve joked at times that we should be called, ‘The Paris Mustard Shop’ because we, like the French, are obsessed with this condiment.
Condiment, hmmm… I take that back. Way of life, is more like it.
Here’s what David says:
“The consumption of Dijon mustard in France is through the roof…I always keep a jar of Amora mustard  on hand, for its nostalgic reasons, and for its fortitude.”
I asked my chef husband to make a dressing for our salad with some of our Amora mustard. He remarked that it was so good he could just eat it on its own!
Serve your Poulet with buttered, herbed, Grand’Mere pasta or celery root puree.

INGREDIENTS
1/2 cup plus 3 tablespoons Dijon mustard
1/4 teaspoon sweet or smoked paprika
 Freshly ground black pepper, to taste
3/4 teaspoon sea salt or kosher salt (optional)
4 bone-in, skin-on chicken thighs and 4 drumsticks (8 pieces total)
1 cup (100 grams) smoked thick-cut bacon, diced
1 small onion, finely diced
1 teaspoon fresh thyme leaves
 Olive oil, for the pan
1 cup (250 milliliters) white wine
1 tablespoon whole mustard seeds or grainy mustard
2 to 3 tablespoons crème fraîche or heavy cream
Warm water, as needed
Chopped flat-leaf parsley or chives, for garnish

DIRECTIONS
1. Mix 1/2 cup Dijon mustard in a bowl with the paprika, a few generous grinds of the peppermill, and the salt, if using. Toss the chicken pieces in the mustard mixture, lifting the chicken skin and rubbing some of the mustard mixture beneath. Set aside while you tend to the bacon and onion.
2. Heat a wide skillet with a lid or a Dutch oven over medium-high heat and add the bacon. Cook the bacon, stirring frequently, just until it’s sorta cooked through and starting to brown, about 4 minutes. Remove the bacon from the skillet and drain on a plate lined with paper towels. Leave about 1 tablespoon bacon fat in the skillet, discarding the rest. 
3. Add the onion to the bacon drippings in the skillet and cook for about 5 minutes, until soft and translucent. Stir in the thyme and let cook for another few minutes, then scrape the cooked onion onto the bacon.
4. Add a little olive oil to the skillet, if necessary, and add the chicken pieces to the skillet in a single layer over medium-high heat. (If the pieces don’t all fit, cook them in 2 batches.) Brown them well on one side, then flip them over and brown them on the other side. It’s important to get the chicken nicely colored, as this coloring—as well as the darkened bits on the bottom of the skillet, called fond—will give the finished sauce its delicious flavor. Place the chicken pieces on the onions and bacon. Add the wine to the hot skillet, scraping the darkened bits off the bottom with a sturdy flat utensil. Return the chicken pieces to the skillet along with the bacon and onions. Cover and cook the chicken over low to medium heat, turning the pieces in the sauce a few times, until the chicken is cooked through, 15 to 25 minutes. Check for doneness by sticking a knife into the meat next to the thigh bone; if the meat is red, continue cooking for a few more minutes.
5. Remove the skillet from the heat. Transfer the chicken to a platter and stir the remaining 3 tablespoons Dijon mustard, the mustard seeds or grainy mustard, and the crème fraîche or heavy cream into the pan drippings. If the sauce has reduced and is quite thick, you can thin it with a little warm water, adding a teaspoon or so at a time. Pour the sauce over the chicken, sprinkle chopped parsley over the top, and serve.

Chateau Ducasse Bordeaux Blanc 2013, Bordeaux $16.99
From a perfectionist winemaker who owns an estate from 1890. This delicious white Bordeaux from Kermit Lynch was simply amazing paired with a Celeriac soup & roast chicken. 60% Sémillon, 5% Muscadelle, 35% Sauvignon Blanc that has a juicy roundness (but no oak), a minerals streak & a kiss of lime. Lovely & affordable any night of the week.

GIFT IDEAS!

Snail Lover
Escargot Baker $6.99
Fork $4.49
Pincers $14.99
Roland shells & dozen escargot $18.99
La Maison de l’Escargot $14.99 (our best!)
Payson Breton butter $7.25
White Toque frozen prepared Escargot $15.99
bottle of Muscadet (snail wine! $11-$16)

Cassoulet Kit
Poterie Not Freres Cassoles $149 (the real deal)
Epices Rabelais $8.49
George Vigeroux Gouleyant Malbec 2012 $11.99
The Cooking of Southwest France by Paula Wolfert $39.95
Distillerie du Perigord Pruneaux a l’Armagnac $27.99

Enfants Français
Baby Cie Plates, Bowls, Cups $3.99-$13.99
Le Petit Prince en Francais $11
Les Animaux: My First Bilingual Book $7.99
Metal Earth Eiffel Tower 3D Model $10
Marzipan Pigs $3.99

The Baker
Baking Chez Moi: Recipes from My Paris Home to Your Home Anywhere by Dorie Greenspan $40
Guittard Bittersweet Chocolate $15.49
Petal Pushing Apron $28
Le Jaquard Francais Confiture Towel $16

Le Souk Ceramique Tagines $64
This hand-crafted Tunisian clay ware is imported by a family business in Bellingham. & we just received a new shipment. We have colorful plates, bowls & mugs, all lead-free & dishwasher safe that start at $8.  But the tagines are show-stoppers. Add a cookbook, preserved lemons, cured olives & harissa and you’ve got a world class gift.

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Colonial influences on French flavor, September 9th Friday, Sep 9 2011 

Paris Grocery News

September 9, 2011

French culture is often prized for its unique characteristics, and for centuries it has been a pinnacle of style and taste. While the influence of French culture cannot be overstated, part of that wonderful je ne se quoi comes from the influence of other cultures upon the French. From Viet Nam to Tunisia, Morocco to Algiers, the French Empire adopted and was influenced by aspects of each of the peoples it colonized. The result is an incredibly rich and varied french palate, a mosaic culture full of nuance and surprise. This week, we pay homage to the fantastic diversity of French culture by showcasing a few of our products that are undeniably French, yet undeniably exotic.

click on the picture for some information/inspiration!

Feuille de brick

Just in this week, we have White Toque Feuille de brick, ‘the finest and crispiest of them all’. Originally from Tunisia, brick pastry dough is impossibly light and flaky, and used for both sweet and savory appetizers and desserts, baked or fried. There are 10 sheets (12″ diameter) in each frozen package, so keep some around for the next time you entertain. They’re a real crowd pleaser. $4.49

Red Boat Fish Sauce

At least once a week we get a call asking if we carry Red Boat Fish Sauce. It’s simply the best fish sauce on the market, an essential ingredient in Vietnamese cooking. Western chefs have embraced fish sauce as a go-to ingredient that draws out a dish’s own flavors and adds a special complexity of taste. Red Boat is an artisan fish sauce that has had people raving. Read up on it here, or here, then come in and try some for yourself! 250 ml bottles are $4.99

Le Souk Tagines

Ghille Basan defines the Tagine as a ‘stew worthy of poetry’ in his book on the subject (which we do carry for $15.99). Tagines are truly an art, and are a meal inseparable from the beautiful container they are made in and served from. The conical shape allows steam to circulate inside during cooking, preserving tender flavors. We sell a few different styles of Tagine, so whether you’re a beginner or a professional you can appreciate the succulent and aromatic spice of Morrocco. From Le Souk we carry clay cooking tagines in small and large sizes, as well as hand painted ceramic serving tagines that are drop-dead gorgeous. $40.00-$60.00

Emile Henry Tagines

But for the true marriage of French and North African cooking, no Tagine can compare with Emile Henry’s Poterie Culinaire. The Burgundy Clay that Emile Henry uses is slowly disperses heat, can be put on direct flame, under a broiler, in the microwave and in the dishwasher. Emile Henry offers the highest quality products, and they guarantee their Tagines with a limited 10 year warranty. A beautiful investment or gift for someone who loves to cook. We have them in two sizes and four colors. $126.00

And of course, the drinks (As a side note, today’s ‘french phrase’ from our one-a-day calendar is “ça l’aide à se détendre” or ‘it helps him to relax’. We thought it was appropriate)!

2009 Domaine Olivier Hillaire Chateauneuf-du-pape $55.00

Bright ruby. Spicy strawberry and raspberry aromas are lifted by a floral element and a hint of black tea. Fresh and precise, accented by silky texture and good breadth. Finishes firm and persistent, with attractive fruit and a slight dryness. this 2009 Chateauneuf du Pape has outstanding depth of dark fruit, and will be perfect to drink starting in November. What a wonderful investment for the holiday season.

2009 Cercius Cotes du Rhone Villages $16.99

The 2009 Cercius red, a Visan Cotes du Rhone-Villages, is composed of 85% Grenache and 15% Syrah. It represents a naked expression of Cotes du Rhone as it is aged completely in concrete prior to bottling. This medium to full-bodied wine possesses a deep ruby/purple color in addition to copious black currant and black cherry fruit interwoven with graphite, crushed rocks, and spice, excellent fruit intensity, a full-bodied mouthfeel, good acidity, and light tannins. It should drink nicely for 3-4 years.

Clos Normand Brut French Fermented Cider $6.99

If you’ve ever been curious about French Cider, Clos Normand is a great introduction. If you’re already a fan, than Clos Normand is an old favorite. With crisp red apple notes and a hint of fresh bread, this is an inviting and uncomplicated cider sure to please just about anyone.

For the latest Paris Grocery news and musings, join us on Facebook!

Thanks for reading, see you soon!
Ellen

and
Steve Winston and Sharon Baden
Owners, Paris Grocery
A wine and cheese shop with a french mood

1418 Western Ave
Seattle, WA 98101
206.682.0679

Monday-Saturday
10 to 6
Sunday
11 to 5

Paris Grocery News 5/7 Saturday, May 7 2011 

Consider a box of unique cookies for Mom. Fossier's Biscuits Roses are best when dunked in Champagne, which is so fancy it's almost unbearable.

Gifts @ PG

We love Mother’s Day; it’s a chance to celebrate any mother or mother-figure in your life. We’ve got so many gifts and sweets and snacks that would make a terrific gift for Mom, it’s ridiculous.

Until a shop in Seattle makes decent macarons, consider making your own!

I Heart Macarons by Hisako Ogita is full of charming, colorful pictures as well as specific technical instruction for making macarons. Our book section is bursting with cookbooks, France-located fiction, and wish-fulfillment nonfiction about living in France.

Everyone needs tiny footed dishes.

Victoriana Noir Footed Dishes by Rosanna are great for mustard, chocolates, or spare change. We also carry teapots, plates, and mugs from this local designer who specializes in sophisticated whimsy.

We’d also be glad to help you put together a collection of sweet and savory foodstuffs: jams, mustards, olives, vinegars, cookies, and more. Happy Mother’s Day!

Wines @ PG

A rebel's last yell, my favorite pink, and an exceptional Cab Franc.

2010 Marcel Lapierre Raisins Gaulois Gamay

Marcel Lapierre was a renowned producer of Beaujolais wines, and his death last year marked a sad end to a vivacious man and a tireless advocate for biodynamic production and non-interventionist winemaking. He was one of the “Gang of Four” rebel winemakers in Beaujolais, a group of vitners dedicated to making natural, delicious wines and bucking convention and appellation when necessary. Despite his disregard for the system, Marcel was one of the most respected producers in France. His Raisins Gaulois Gamay is absolutely charming, grapey, and fresh, with spicy black cherry notes and a little dustiness. Though not an “official” Beaujolais, it shows how great these light-hearted wines can be. We’ve brought in three cases of this delicious wine—it’s not to be missed!

2010 Domaine de Fontsainte Corbières Gris de Gris

This remains one of my absolute favorite rosés, over several vintages. It’s a unique “Gris de Gris” that’s made from both Grenache Noir and Grenache Gris, along with a few other southern French varietals. Bruno Laboucarié show the same care with his rosé as with his red wine, harvesting by hand and pressing whole clusters of grapes to preserve their delicate aromas. Incredibly fresh, with zippy strawberry notes and superb minerality. This will make a superb accompaniment to olives, grilled shrimp, and other savory snacks common in Corbières. Bring on the sunshine!

2009 Catherine & Pierre Breton Chinon

Imported by Kermit Lynch, who knows a thing or two about funky, interesting wines. We’re big fans of this producer, as well—their unique, terroir-driven wines are a hit on the bistro scene in Paris. This Cabernet Franc is full of dark fruit and savory, olive notes, with mostly smooth tannins. Check out what Kermit Lynch had to say about the Bretons.

Thanks for reading, see you soon!
Rachel

and
Steve Winston and Sharon Baden
Owners, Paris Grocery

Paris Grocery News 1/29 Saturday, Jan 29 2011 

The milk of Tarine cows is used to make luscious Alpine cheeses, such as Beaufort, which is our choice when making French onion soup! Picture from Olive White Photography.

Food (& Cheese!) @ PG

“The onion is the truffle of the poor.”

French Onion Soup (Adapted from Bistro Cooking by Patricia Wells)

I find this version one of the lightest onion soups I’ve tried; perhaps it’s because the onions are roasted first. Be sure to use good white sweet onions (yellow onions can turn bitter). If this is likely to become a family favorite, it’s worthwhile to invest in traditional onion soup bowls. Makes 2 servings.

1 very large (1 pound) white onion (such as Bermuda), thinly sliced

10 sprigs thyme

1 bay leaf

1 clove garlic, minced

2 tablespoons (1 ounce) unsalted butter

1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil

1/4 cup dry sherry

32 oz unsalted chicken stock, preferably homemade

2-4 slices crusty baguette

2 cups (about 5 ounces) grated Beaufort cheese

1. Heat olive oil and butter in large sauté pan. When butter has melted, add onions, garlic, thyme, and bay leaf. Cook slowly over very low heat for at least 30 minutes until onion is very soft and most of the liquid is absorbed. Add the sherry, turn the heat to high, and simmer for a few minutes until most of the sherry has been absorbed.

2. Turn on oven broiler. Bring the stock to a simmer in a large nonreactive saucepan.

3. Evenly distribute the cooked onions between 2 soup bowls. Pour in the simmering stock. Place a round or two of bread on top of each; evenly distribute the grated cheese. Place the soup bowls under the broiler and broil just until the cheese is melted (2 or 3 minutes). Serve immediately.

Wine @ PG

Yay, wine!

St. Cosme Little James’ Basket Press Rouge NV ($12.99)

Another example of a high-end producer (in this case, Louis Barroul, a 14th generation producer of Gigondas) making a delightful low-end wine that we can’t resist. This 100% Grenache is made using the solera system; it’s bright and juicy with moderate tannins. A great, easy-drinking wine!

Domaine de la Chanteleuserie “Cuvee Alouette” Bourgueil 2009 ($14.99)

Another example of a supremely drinkable 100% Cabernet Franc. This Bourgueil exhibits pure fruit flavors, with a delicious earthiness. Low tannins make it quaffable but it still offers great length and power.

2008 Philippe Raimbault “Apud Sariacum” Sancerre ($22.99)

There is no more beautiful expression of Sauvignon Blanc than the wines of Sancerre. The cool climate, chalky soil, and passion of the small producers bring this grape to the height of its aromatic, austere elegance. Philippe Raimbault, a ninth-generation producer, puts enormous care into his small family of wines. This Sancerre has flavors of limestone, crushed rocks, and a heady, enticing florality that is nevertheless retrained. An excellent, refreshing texture for a pure finish.

Craves @ PG

Gratin bowls

We love ceramics from Graupera; the Spanish Table offers many of their pots, tagines, and casserole dishes large and small. New to Paris Grocery are these stout soup bowls ($11.99), perfect for individual servings of French onion soup. The quality of the glazes and materials means they’ll stand up to heating, dishwashing, and even microwaving for many years to come; we also love how these ceramics tend to look better with a bit of use (we think food even TASTES better when cooked in well-used ceramics).

Gifted @ PG

Bistro Cooking by Patricia Wells

This week’s recipe came from this classic, easy-to-follow book of bistro favorites by Patricia Wells. She’s an incredible authority on French cuisine, and this book offers up some choice bistro-culture knowledge as well. I want to try Oxtail Terrine (pg. 125), Leek Terrine with Truffles (pg. 82), and Zucchini Crepes (pg. 92). Her recipe for Riz au Lait (pg. 250) looks promising, as well; it calls for orange and lemon zest which always makes things taste better.

Thanks for reading, see you soon!
Rachel

and
Steve Winston and Sharon Baden
Owners, Paris Grocery

Paris Grocery News 1/21 Friday, Jan 21 2011 

 

Wine decanter.

Wine @ PG

New to the shop: Wine accoutrements (seems to be the right word) for those of you who want to get the most out of your Champagnes and Bordeaux.

Stoppers and openers.

From True:

  • Wine decanter: a classic Italian design made with hand-blown, lead-free glass. The broad base of the decanter allows particularly heady red wines to aerate and open up (that means it’ll taste better). ($29.99)
  • Champagne cork remover: helps ease the cork out of high-pressure sparklers so you get the best presentation of bubbles. ($11.99)
  • Champagne stoppers: the stainless steel and silicone stopper offers a super-snug fit and a nice design. ($9.99); the cheaper chrome and rubber stopper works well, too ($4.99). I love being able to keep a bottle of sparkling fresh for days.

Vinturi wine aerator.

From Vinturi:

  • Wine aerator: Nothing worse than waiting for a wine to optimize. Our wine buyer, Sharon, swears by this very cool gizmo. Simply hold the aerator over your glass and pour; its design attracts and mixes air to the wine, so you get more intensity from the aroma and flavors of the wine. ($38)

From Private Reserve:

  • Wine preserver: A environmentally safe bottle of inert gas that blankets the wine’s surface and displaces oxygen, maintaining its freshness and flavor. Works for not only wine but also things like scotch, cognac, and port. ($10.50)

Craves @ PG

Roland anchovies.

The other night I went out to dinner at Cascina Spinasse on Capitol Hill, and the kitchen sent out an amuse-bouche that was utterly perfect: a slice of toasty bread smeared liberally with butter and an anchovy fillet. Savory, crunchy, and creamy, all at the same time. I’m so glad to see anchovies making such inroads into the culinary scene; it seems like they’re on every menu these days! We have lots of options for anchovies, in cans and jars. But the customer favorite seems to be these Roland brand anchovies in the flip-top glass jar. Packed in olive oil, these are ready to be added to salads, pasta, flatbread pizzas, or crostini. I think there is some interest in reusing the cool jar, as well. And: They’re good for you!

Gifted @ PG

Tagine and cookbook.

This week’s idea would make an excellent gift anytime of the year, but as a Valentine’s Day gift, it’s a unique choice for someone who likes to cook. We have these colorful tagines ($40) from Le Souk Ceramique in a wide range of colors (green, yellow, red, white, and blue), as well as simple glazed terra cotta. They are a fantastic addition to a cookware arsenal, and they’re also really pretty as objects. I’d suggest getting this excellent cookbook as well; many people who first start cooking with tagines need good ideas. “Flavors of Morocco” by Ghillie Bașan ($24.95) is simply laid out and full of bright, tantalizing pictures. Along with the classic meat and seafood tagine dishes, there are recipes for simple things like making your own harissa or bissara (a garlicky fava bean dip). She also includes background and stories for the recipes and traditions of Moroccan cooking, including instructions for a mint tea service. Finally, it might also be fun to toss in a jar of preserved lemons or ras-el-hanout, the typical spice mix for tagines.

 

Thanks for reading, see you soon!
Rachel

and
Steve Winston and Sharon Baden
Owners, Paris Grocery

Paris Grocery News 11/21 Sunday, Nov 21 2010 

(Serving Suggestion.)

Wine @ PG

Here’s a recommended lineup of wines for the Thanksgiving meal, from bubbly to white to red. And there are so many more amazing options here at the shop: cremants, rosés, Burgundy, Bordeaux, dessert wines, and more.

Stephane Coquillette “Carte d’Or” Brut Champagne ($47)

This delicious Champagne is comprised of 60 % Pinot Noir and 40% Chardonnay grapes, which are culled from the Grand Crus and Premier Crus of the harvest. Exhibits amazing complexity with notes of melon, berries, toast, and buttered brioche. A persistent finish and fine bubbles: a divine way to start off your feast!

2009 Frédéric Gueguen Petite Chablis ($16.99)

What a delicious wine! Very characteristic of what a Chablis should be: crisp, clean, and elegant. Aromas of tart green apples, toasted almonds, grass and a touch of minerality. This wine pairs well with a wide range of foods, making it our choice for an outstanding Thanksgiving white wine.

2009 Marcel Lapierre Morgon ($24.99)

Marcel Lapierre was a renowned producer of Beaujolais wines, and his death this year marks a sad end to a vivacious man and a tireless advocate for biodynamic production and non-interventionist winemaking. His beloved Gamay grape gets its full expression in this vintage: Exuberant strawberry and red raspberry threaded with lilac, striking notes of blood orange rind, nutmeg, toasted pecan, blond tobacco, and subtle hints of game and forest floor. Silken in texture, sappy and pungent, this finishes with an exhilaratingly animated exchange of fruit, flower, and mineral elements and a sense of levity rare for its vintage.” 93 points Robert Parker

Meat @ PG

 

Pâté de Campagne

Pâté Provençal

Coarse yet spreadable, this pork pâté has bits of green olives and red pepper throughout. Flavorful, with plenty of herbs and spices. $14.99/lb

Pâté de Campagne

This country-style pork spread is coarsely textured and generously seasoned with black pepper. We like seeing who gets the carrot slice on top! $15.99/lb

Mousse Basquaise

Inspired by Basque flavors. Made with duck liver, roasted red bell peppers, and port wine. A bit of spice breaks up the creaminess of the mousse. $16.99/lb

Truffle Mousse

A delectable combination of chicken liver, truffles, and sherry. Savor with baguette and either a light Beaujolais or a sweet Sauternes. $18.99/lb

Duck Mousse with Port Wine

A savory, spreadable mousse made with duck liver, port wine, and spices. No artificial ingredients. Delicious! $20.99/lb

Goose Mousse Supreme

Made with goose and duck liver, and Sauternes. Set in aspic with oranges. One of our most popular mousses, this one is truly indulgent. $25.99/lb

And this just in: Fois Gras Mousse from D’Artagnan!

Craves @ PG

Syrups.

It’s the season of syrups. The distillation of fruit, flowers, or nuts into sugary liquid form, making everything sweeter and therefore better. We’ve got some fantastic options for adding flavor to your hot drinks, cocktails, whipped cream, and sweet treats. We have a wide range of Monin syrups, including grenadine, almond, caramel, and peppermint. Try maple spice or pumpkin spice to make a flavored whipped cream for pies and tarts. We also love L’Épicerie de Provence syrups. Cassis works for making celebratory Kir Royale cocktails, and we recommend Violet, Lavender or Chocolate Hazelnut in baked goods and candies.

Gifted @ PG

Le Souk Ceramique.

These brightly colored ceramics from Tunisia are all made and painted by hand. 100 percent food safe, and appropriate for use in the dishwasher and microwave. Above is the “Sauvage” pattern; we have over 6 patterns available in bowls, plates, mugs, teapots, and more. A beautiful tradition of craft making continues!

Thanks for reading, see you soon!
Rachel

and
Steve Winston and Sharon Baden
Owners, Paris Grocery

Paris Grocery News 6/4 Sunday, Jun 6 2010 

Tome de Bordeaux, a cheese "centerfold" from Culture magazine! Photo by Gregory Cherin.

Recently we got our hands on Culture Magazine’s summer edition, and it fell open immediately to its ogle-worthy centerfold, Tome de Bordeaux. It’s stunning, and we just had to have it. We already know and love Tome d’Acquitaine, an aged goat cheese bathed in Sauternes, which also comes from the Jean d’Alos caves. Like the Aquitaine, the Tome de Bordeaux is made with goat milk and has the same beautiful snow white interior and fresh, floral aromas. But this cheese has another layer (a thing which Seattleites can always appreciate). This tome wears an amazing Technicolor coat of dried green herbs, including fennel, rosemary, thyme, savory, and oregano. On top of that is a starburst pattern of paprika, juniper berries, white peppercorns, and bird’s-eye peppers. It’s seriously attractive. The cheese is soft yet compact, with an enticing aroma and a clean, sweet, and earthy flavor. Get a little bit of the rind for some texture and powerful herbal flavor. This cheese calls out to be enjoyed by itself, with a little fruit confit (we’ve got suggestions) and a glass of white wine, or even a full-bodied rosé like the 2007 Marsannay Pinot Noir Rosé. We’re offering the Tome de Bordeaux for $8.25 for a quarter pound.

We also have some other fantastic new arrivals in the cheese case, which you can read about in the Cheese section below!

Wine @ PG
Buy any six bottles and get 10% off!

The Val de Loire is a wine “safety zone” for me. With whites and reds that are extremely food and wallet friendly, they’re always a pleasure to recommend to the lost souls who wander into the shop looking for something that will quench their thirst, and maybe satisfy a deeper need, at dinner time.

2008 Les Haut Vingot Anjou $8.99
A perennial favorite, this 100% Chenin Blanc is a great wine for cheeses ranging soft and creamy to sharp and nutty. Aromatic, with pear and tropical fruit notes, it is a fresh, young drinking white. Grown on the white limestone soil of Anjou, it is round on the palate, with a zippy finish!

2005 Chateau de Bellevue “Le Croix Picot” Savennières $18.99
In this Savennières, Chenin Blanc unveils its full sophistication and suavité. It grows on the esteemed vineyard of “Le Croix Picot”, known for its “crimson soil”, a mix of sandstone and shale. The wine is fermented in barrels with natural yeast. Elegant, with beeswax, quince, bread dough, and lime flowers on the nose. Plump, yet with a clean, crisp finish. Wonderfully balanced, it is a superlative pairing for the whole gamme of cheeses.

2008 Clos des Briords Muscadet Sevre et Maine Sur Lie VV $16.99
While there may not be a more natural pairing than Muscadet and oysters, straying from the beaten paths will bring delightful surprises. The high acidity and low alcohol brighten flavors and refresh the palate, enhancing and marrying the flavors of seafood, herbs, and seasonings. This one comes from an old vine planting, and the wine is aged on the lees for 18-24 months. With the exquisite minerality that is typical of Muscadet in this appellation, the wine exudes fresh notes of limestone and sea breeze. The slight salinity is off-set by a touch of creaminess on the palate. It is by far, my new favorite white in our shop!

“Bright straw. A piercing, energetic array of citrus and floral scents, complicated by strong minerality and a note of white pepper. Bitter lime pith and quinine flavors gain flesh and weight with air, taking a turn to sweeter tangerine and quince. Strikingly balanced and precise, with a long, spicy, mineral-dominated finish. This should be even better with a couple year of bottle age.92 points Stephen Tanzer

2008 Philippe Raimbault “Apud Sariacum” Sancerre $22.99
There is no more beautiful expression of Sauvignon Blanc than the wines of Sancerre. The cool climate, chalky soil, and passion of the small producers bring this grape to the height of its aromatic, austere elegance. Limestone, chalk, crushed rocks, and a heady, enticing florality that is nevertheless retrained. Excellent texture. Philippe Raimbault, a ninth-generation producer, puts enormous care into his small family of wines, even hand-harvesting, which is rare for this region. You’ll be hard-pressed to find a more perfect example of Sancerre!

2009 Chateau de la Bonnelière Touraine Rosé $13.99
Medium salmon, this northerly rosé comes from a biodynamic estate where the soil is dominated by flinty clay. Restricted yields lead to a medium weight with raspberry, minerality, a slight herbaceous tint and silky finish. Delicious and distinctive, made from 100% Cabernet Franc, this is a great wine for rosé-lovers who want to get their pink-wary friends hooked on rosé!

Cheese @ PG

George attacks our super-sized Cantal Doux.

It’s a blessing and a curse to be both a cheesemonger and obsessively detail-oriented. It’s been one of those crazy mornings with a large shipment of cheeses: cutting and wrapping the new arrivals, finding them a home in the case, and, of course, sampling them merrily. Along with the Tome de Bordeaux, here are some of our first impressions of the new cheeses on the block:

Bethmale Tradition Chèvre ($7.99/quarter lb): We already love our mixed-milk Bethmale and the glowering face of Jean Faup on its label. This version is made exclusively with goat’s milk. It has a semi-firm texture with tiny little eyes (holes) throughout, offering an airy, delicate feel on the palate. Not goaty at all, this cheese is sweet, nutty, and mild.

Bethmale Tradition Chevre, with Jean Faup looking sternly over his caves.

La Ramier Roux ($5.75/quarter lb): From the southwestern region of Tarn, near Toulouse, an area replete with medieval ruins. This washed-rind cow’s milk cheese is fruity and sweet, with a creamy, unctuous texture. We’ve declared it our new go-to “snack attack” fix. Try it with our best-selling 2007 Trois Bastides Côtes du Tarn.

La Cadenelle de Hyelzas ($8.25/quarter lb): What the Causses! This somewhat desolate area of limestone plateaus churns out some of my favorite cheeses because of their rustic, clean flavors. La Cadenelle is a sheep’s milk cheese with crushed juniper berries added to the curd during production. We love the slightly textured feel in the mouth and the hint of spice and earthiness from the juniper berries, which balanced the sweetness of the cheese.

Cheese meets classic martini in the Juniper berry infused La Cadenelle.

Cantal Doux ($4.49/quarter lb): This cheese is often referred to as “the cheddar of France.” We like it because it’s cut for us from a huge, beautiful wheel. When we tasted it this morning, it was particularly “cheddar-y”: mild and nutty, with a touch of sharpness on the finish. Try a Cantal and Apple Grilled Cheese sandwich: it’ll rock your lunchbox.


Charcuteire @ PG

It rhymes!

Two completely different kinds of salami, which we love for different reasons.

Duck Salami
: Uber-rich, this dry salami is cured with sea salt and garlic. Balanced flavors and a silky texture- exquisite!

Sweet Salami
: From Freybe comes this Hungarian-style salami with a creamy, finely ground texture. With a mild, vinegary flavor and a touch of garlic, this salami makes a stellar sandwich or pizza topper. Kids will love it, and so will you!

Feed Your Mind @ PG

French Feasts

Boasting 299 classic French recipes, the collection’s real treasure lies in its quirky notes and cartoons on French culture, local artisans (a sexy baker!), and kitchen wisdom. A great gift for the cook who is comfortable in the kitchen and has a sense of humor.

Just for Fun @ PG

Mini-Tagines for your table salt!

These are so cute they should be outlawed ($8.99/ea).

Thanks for reading, see you soon!
Abi & Rachel

and

Steve Winston & Sharon Baden, Owners

Paris Grocery News 5/6 Thursday, May 6 2010 

By any other name

My mother has had many gardens, being transplanted across the country more than once after marrying my father. In every garden, she would plant a rosebed, with creamy yellows, peaches, striped belles, and peony pink petals. As soon as it was warm enough for blooming, a vase of roses would sit at our kitchen table, their fragile scent mixing in with whatever my mom was cooking. When Mother’s Day rolls around each year, it is only natural that I think of sweet-smelling roses, and by extension, rosé wines. They may be so named because of their color, but I think the name fits in so many dimensions. Their delicate fragrance, often floral as well as fruity, and their sheer beauty in a glass, are just some of the traits they share with their botanical homonyms. France accords rosé wines as much respect as the reds and whites, and if you taste some of our selections, it is easy to see why. Their brightness and lovely aromatic mixture of fruit and minerality makes them excellent wines for the dinner table. Refreshing, elegant, and interesting, they are no wallflowers in the world of wine. They remind us, with every sip, that a great wine is, first and foremost, a pleasure to drink. Treat a loved one to this delight!

Shades of Rosé

Wines @ PG
Buy any six bottles of wine and get 10% off!

We have two sparkling rosés! The dry and seductive Rosé d’Orfeuilles ($14.99) from Touraine, and FRV 100 (muster all your high-school French and say it aloud. Get it? There’s some brilliant word-play going on), an off-dry Gamay made in the ancestral method, with the delicious, bright red fruit of the appellation ($21.99).

2009 Triennes Rosé ($15.99) – Primarily Cinsault, the juice for this Provençal rosé spent only a couple of hours in contact with the skins, resulting in a very pale color and delicate texture. It was bottled early to maintain its vibrant freshness.

2009 Moulin de Gassac Guilhem Rosé ($13.99) – Deep blush, the Syrah-Grenache blend is round and fruit forward, with crushed fruit and the slightest hint of spice.

2009 Cape Bleue Rosé ($10.99) – From top Rhône producer Jean-Luc Colombo comes an intoxicating rosé made from Syrah (40%), Mourvèdre (40%), and Counoise (20%). Perfumed and fresh, with notes of peach, raspberries and white pepper.

Cheese @ PG

If you’re planning a special meal for Mother’s Day, be sure to look in the cheese case! Rachel will help you put together a balanced cheese plate, whether you’re a fan of floral, springy cheeses like the Fleur Verte and the Olivade Violet, or are drawn to the pungent depths of the Bethmale. We’re gearing up for the Seattle Cheese Festival and have stocked the case with some hard-to-find cheeses (Herve Mons’ Cone de Port Aubry, Roquefort Coulet, Tomme du Berger), so there’s never been a better time come over and try some unusual cheeses!

Charcuterie @ PG
It rhymes!

Meat pile at a French market.

It may not be cassoulet season anymore, but it is always a good time for Duck Confit! Try shredding it and tossing it into a green salad with string beans, or sprinkle it over a thin, crispy pizza crust with figs, arugula, and Le Somport cheese.

We also have two kinds of Duck Salami, from Fabrique Delices and Savory Farms.

Finally, don’t forget about our Goose Mousse Supreme! Delicate, creamy, this delectable pâté is the perfect indulgence on special occasions.

Gifts & Goodies

Mothers have so many names: travel buddy, role model, cheerleader, coach, nurse, drill sergeant, chef, confidant, comforter, comedian, housekeeper, driver, and so the list goes on. In honor of all those facets, we have a list of gifts, sure to make her smile.

For the cheesehead
: A 3-piece knife set made with eco-friendly materials from cutlery expert Languiole, and an olive-wood cutting board.

For the memory-keeper: From Yellow Owl Co., a stamp set with the Eiffel tower, or a package of hand-pressed French postcards.

For the one whose hands are always busy: Our hands are always chapped from scrubbing and washing, so we know how much she’ll appreciate 80 Acres soaps and lotions. From natural, organic ingredients, these elegantly scented products are heaven on tired skin.

For the storyteller: “Gourmet Rhapsody” by bestselling author Muriél Barbery. A sensuous and witty novel written from the perspective of a grumpy food critic searching for a forgotten flavor, before it is too late.

For the queen of tea time: A ceramic teapot, in classic black-and-white Victoriana, or in one of our colorful Tunisian patterns.

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Thanks for reading, see you soon!