March 15 Wednesday, Mar 21 2012 

Paris Grocery News
March 15th, 2012

We got a lot of new products in over the last week, so come in to check them all out! I could only pick out a few favorites to share this week though. Without further ado:

 

Chateau Haut-Mongeat Graves de Vayres Blanc 2010

40% Semillon, 40% Muscadelle, 20% Sauvignon Blanc. Light gold in color, this delicious blend is fresh and lively with a palate-cleansing, racy acidity and bright, ripe fruit. The bouquet is highly aromatic with abundant notes of apple, pear, pineapple, and flowers. Drink it as an aperitif or serve with almost any seafood, pork, or chicken. Excellent with spicy dishes! $10.99

Chateau D’Arlay NV Macvin du Jura Rouge

A wine-geek’s wine, Macvin expands our understanding of wine in general and is a fascinating, adventurous treat. One third brandy and two thirds Pinot Noir grape must, this Macvin is held 4 years in casks and one year in old oak before being released. The result is curious, rich, layered dessert wine with plenty of spice. It reveals huge intensity along with some sweetness and glycerin from its red liqueur, with some slight peppermint notes as well. 95 points, Wine Advocate $21.99 350 ml

Tirecul la Graviere Monbazillac 2007 Les Pins

“Tirecul la Graviere is recognized as the top property of the [Monbazillac] AOC. The fame of Chateau Tirecul la Graviere has spread far and wide over the last several years. Most notably, Robert Parker has awarded the property two 100 point scores and compared it with Sauterne’s Chateau d’Yquem. With good acidity and a solid backbone, these wines can last for decades, a rarity in wines from this area of Southwest France. These wines are magical, defining examples of the best that Monbazillac can offer. 80% Semillon, 20% Muscadelle botrytized grapes grown in chalky soil, seeing some French oak. $19.99 500 ml

2009 La Granacha Vielles Vignes

The 2009 La Granacha is made from 100% old vine Grenache (some parcels are nearly 100 years old). Also aged in tank before being bottled unfined and unfiltered, this is the most powerful La Granacha yet made, tipping the scales at nearly 16% natural alcohol. The belief that such a powerful wine can not also be elegant is disproved by the precise, fresh, lively kirsch liqueur notes intermixed with tobacco leaf, loamy soil, and forest floor characteristics. This delicious, deep ruby/plum-colored, round, generous, glycerin-filled wine can be enjoyed over the next several years. 90 points Wine Advocate $14.99

2010 Andezon Cotes du Rhone

The classic cuvee, which has long been selected by importer Eric Solomon, is their 2010 Domaine d’Andezon, a blend of 90% Syrah and 10% Grenache. While there are critics of Syrah grown in the southern Rhone, even the cynics agree that the old-vine Syrah from the Gard has a special character to it. This wine comes from 40+-year-old Syrah vines and 60+-year-old Grenache vines, bottled unfined and unfiltered after being aged in both tank and concrete. Dense ruby/purple, with a stunning nose of blackberry liqueur and jus de viande (beef/meat juices), its thrilling, intensely pure, full-bodied mouthfeel, good freshness, and striking floral character all combine for one of the very best bargains in dry red wine that readers are likely to find anywhere in the world. 91 points Wine Advocate $14.99

2010 Domaine de Fees

The newest cuvee is from a single estate, located just to the west of Lirac, called Domaine des Fees. Bottled separately, there are 1,000 cases for the US market and this blend of equal parts Grenache and Syrah, aged completely in concrete tanks, is stunning. Gorgeous notes of roasted meats, Provencal herbs, sweet black cherry liqueur, and licorice as well as spice jump from the glass of this dense, ruby/purple-tinged wine. Fresh, full-bodied and juicy, with a velvety texture, it is a beauty that would be best drunk over the next 3-4 years. Think of it as a Chateauneuf du Pape wearing a Cotes du Rhone mask.90 points Wine Advocate 

$14.99

Cheeses

 

Brillat Savarin

Nirvana on a cracker! One of the most decadent cheeses you will ever eat, Brillat Savarin aux truffles is named after the so-called “Father of Modern Cooking.” The decadently creamy texture and milky flavor of this fresh cheese pairs beautifully with the earthy and aromatic black truffles. Definitely a cheese to share with friends! Try it with buttery crackers for a savory snack or paired with fruit for an over-the-top dessert. $46.99

Montealva

Montealva is a semi-soft pastuerized goat cheese form Cadiz. Like Amercian goat cheeses Montealva is creamy, but has more of a moist chalky texture on the pallete. The mild slightly piquant goat tang translates into vibrant lemon tones and a lasting citrus finish. $20.99

Dark Chocolate Fondue with Fleur de Sel

This charming chocolate fondue is a mixture of 70% dark chocolate and fleur de sel, adding a little kick to a favorite dessert. The ceramic cup is microwaveable, or it can be heated in a double broiler. Either way, use it to dip your favorite fruits and cookies and see what a little fleur de sel adds to a sweet treat! $22.99

We’ve always loved and carried Traou Mad de Pont Aven cookies from Brittany. Made with salted butter, these thick biscuits are supremely dunk-worthy. But in honor of the Gauguin exhibit at the Seattle Art Museum, we’ve brought in these adorable Gauguin tins of cookies. Stop by the Paris Grocery after seeing the masterpieces and pick up a tasty souvenir! $13.99 each

Pan Ducale Bastoncini Biscotti-Cantuccini. I opened these biscotti today for purely scientific purposes, and half the box was gone by noon. The same fate befell all the biscotti pictured above. Seriously addicting, these biscotti have the right balance of crunch and crumble to hold up by themselves or go with your morning coffee. Available in almond or chocolate-hazelnut. $6.24 each.

 

For the latest Paris Grocery news and musings, join us on Facebook! Archives of this newsletter and other articles can be found on our blog.

Thanks for reading, and we’ll see you in the shop!

Ellen

and
Steve Winston and Sharon Baden
Owners, Paris Grocery

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Colonial influences on French flavor, September 9th Friday, Sep 9 2011 

Paris Grocery News

September 9, 2011

French culture is often prized for its unique characteristics, and for centuries it has been a pinnacle of style and taste. While the influence of French culture cannot be overstated, part of that wonderful je ne se quoi comes from the influence of other cultures upon the French. From Viet Nam to Tunisia, Morocco to Algiers, the French Empire adopted and was influenced by aspects of each of the peoples it colonized. The result is an incredibly rich and varied french palate, a mosaic culture full of nuance and surprise. This week, we pay homage to the fantastic diversity of French culture by showcasing a few of our products that are undeniably French, yet undeniably exotic.

click on the picture for some information/inspiration!

Feuille de brick

Just in this week, we have White Toque Feuille de brick, ‘the finest and crispiest of them all’. Originally from Tunisia, brick pastry dough is impossibly light and flaky, and used for both sweet and savory appetizers and desserts, baked or fried. There are 10 sheets (12″ diameter) in each frozen package, so keep some around for the next time you entertain. They’re a real crowd pleaser. $4.49

Red Boat Fish Sauce

At least once a week we get a call asking if we carry Red Boat Fish Sauce. It’s simply the best fish sauce on the market, an essential ingredient in Vietnamese cooking. Western chefs have embraced fish sauce as a go-to ingredient that draws out a dish’s own flavors and adds a special complexity of taste. Red Boat is an artisan fish sauce that has had people raving. Read up on it here, or here, then come in and try some for yourself! 250 ml bottles are $4.99

Le Souk Tagines

Ghille Basan defines the Tagine as a ‘stew worthy of poetry’ in his book on the subject (which we do carry for $15.99). Tagines are truly an art, and are a meal inseparable from the beautiful container they are made in and served from. The conical shape allows steam to circulate inside during cooking, preserving tender flavors. We sell a few different styles of Tagine, so whether you’re a beginner or a professional you can appreciate the succulent and aromatic spice of Morrocco. From Le Souk we carry clay cooking tagines in small and large sizes, as well as hand painted ceramic serving tagines that are drop-dead gorgeous. $40.00-$60.00

Emile Henry Tagines

But for the true marriage of French and North African cooking, no Tagine can compare with Emile Henry’s Poterie Culinaire. The Burgundy Clay that Emile Henry uses is slowly disperses heat, can be put on direct flame, under a broiler, in the microwave and in the dishwasher. Emile Henry offers the highest quality products, and they guarantee their Tagines with a limited 10 year warranty. A beautiful investment or gift for someone who loves to cook. We have them in two sizes and four colors. $126.00

And of course, the drinks (As a side note, today’s ‘french phrase’ from our one-a-day calendar is “ça l’aide à se détendre” or ‘it helps him to relax’. We thought it was appropriate)!

2009 Domaine Olivier Hillaire Chateauneuf-du-pape $55.00

Bright ruby. Spicy strawberry and raspberry aromas are lifted by a floral element and a hint of black tea. Fresh and precise, accented by silky texture and good breadth. Finishes firm and persistent, with attractive fruit and a slight dryness. this 2009 Chateauneuf du Pape has outstanding depth of dark fruit, and will be perfect to drink starting in November. What a wonderful investment for the holiday season.

2009 Cercius Cotes du Rhone Villages $16.99

The 2009 Cercius red, a Visan Cotes du Rhone-Villages, is composed of 85% Grenache and 15% Syrah. It represents a naked expression of Cotes du Rhone as it is aged completely in concrete prior to bottling. This medium to full-bodied wine possesses a deep ruby/purple color in addition to copious black currant and black cherry fruit interwoven with graphite, crushed rocks, and spice, excellent fruit intensity, a full-bodied mouthfeel, good acidity, and light tannins. It should drink nicely for 3-4 years.

Clos Normand Brut French Fermented Cider $6.99

If you’ve ever been curious about French Cider, Clos Normand is a great introduction. If you’re already a fan, than Clos Normand is an old favorite. With crisp red apple notes and a hint of fresh bread, this is an inviting and uncomplicated cider sure to please just about anyone.

For the latest Paris Grocery news and musings, join us on Facebook!

Thanks for reading, see you soon!
Ellen

and
Steve Winston and Sharon Baden
Owners, Paris Grocery
A wine and cheese shop with a french mood

1418 Western Ave
Seattle, WA 98101
206.682.0679

Monday-Saturday
10 to 6
Sunday
11 to 5

Paris Grocery News, September 1st Thursday, Sep 8 2011 

Paris Grocery News
September 1, 2011
One my favorite things about Paris is its commitment to delight and to delicacy. Subtle, light flavors and textures abound and are taken to an art form in a fluffy croissant, a bottle of Champagne, a macaron or a creamy brie. Lucky for you, we have all of these charming Parisian treats right here in Seattle.

macaron

 

Macarons

A perfect example of a simple dessert taken to a pinnacle of taste is the macaron. Invented in Paris in the early nineteenth century, the macaron consisted of two almond-egg white wafers with ganache in the middle. More recently, the macaron has become a showcase for pastry chefs to present their creativity. It’s the size of a large truffle, gloriously smooth, and comes in almost every flavor imaginable. We have ours frozen for freshness, in two different twelve packs ($15.99 each): chocolate, pistachio, cappucino, and lemon or raspberry, mango, lemon, and strawberry. Or try a 32 pack with chocolate, coffee, vanilla, pistachio, apricot, mango passion fruit, and apple cinnamon. $36.59.

croissant

 Croissant

As long as we’re on the subject of fluffy pastries, I’ve got to mentionbn  the humble croissant. Only the most iconic French pastry, it’s a testament to French sensibility that something so light can be made with so. much. butter. We have packs of 10 frozen mini croissants ready- to-bake made with pure butter. $6.99. Or for the same price, try 10 mini pain au chocolat. Of course, they’re wonderful with espresso for breakfast, but really, we could eat these all day long.

 Brie

Brie Miramont

This week we found the perfect brie, and we plan on stocking it for a while. Brie Miramont has a distinctively succulent, ripe, rich, and creamy flavor. Only gently pasteurized at moderate temperatures, our brie retains most of the authentic flavors and qualities of the raw-milk cheese you can buy only in France. Deliciously buttery with a gooey interior. $12.99/lb.

2009 Chateau Guiraud Bordeaux Blanc Sec

White Bordeaux can be hard to find, but lately we’ve been getting a few requests for it, and we can understand why. Chataeau Guirand’s Bordeaux Blanc Sec is a fresh white, with a creamy edge to the peach, melon and salted butter notes. The stylish finish lets a hint of macadamia nut chime in. Sauvignon Blanc and Sémillon. Drink now. The 2010 white Bordeaux are quite good as well, but as Steven Tanzer says, “overall, 2010 cannot match 2009 for sheer opulence”. $19.99

Francois Chauvent Silver Cap Grand Blanc de Blancs Brut

Of course, the city of light would be nothing without a bit of sparkle. Silver Cap is a great value sparkler. It has malt, nut and brioche notes, yet is substantially lighter and finer in weight and texture than Champagne. With modest citrus and a crisp balanced acidity, this is a fun and zippy wine perfect for toasting or pairing with rich foods. $10.99

Stephane Coquillet Champagne Brut

This delicious champagne is comprised of 60% Pinot Noir and 40% Chardonnay grapes, which are culled from the Grand Crus and Premier Crus of the harvest. It Exhibits amazing complexity with notes of melon, berries, toast, and butter. A persistant finish and fine bubbles: a divine way to start a feast! $47.00

 

For the latest Paris Grocery news and musings, join us on Facebook!
Thanks for reading, see you soon!
Ellen
and
Steve Winston and Sharon Baden
Owners, Paris Grocery
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About Us

A wine and cheese shop with a french mood1418 Western Ave
Seattle, WA 98101
206.682.0679

Monday-Saturday
10 to 6
Sunday
11 to 5

Paris Grocery News 2/26 Saturday, Feb 26 2011 

"I take it with sugar!" -Paul Verlaine, noted poet, rebel, and absinthe addict.

Food & Sweets @ PG

A shipment of items so wonderful and weird, I have to mention them all.

Absinthe Sugar by Bonnecaze & Cie (5¢). These sugar cubes are ostensibly more “melty” (technical term) than other sugar cubes—the better to pour absinthe over, my dear. Also for people who love tiny things in old-timey packaging.

"To feel bright and alert."

Underberg ($1.79/each or $4.99/3). I was having a drink at 611 Supreme one night and saw a display of this herbal digestive sitting on the bar. The picture on the box—a lady in white offering up a handful of herbs that swirled and floated away to the heavens—was just too much. The bartender recommended we knock back the entire 20 mL (ingredients: water, alcohol, natural flavors from herbs and roots of the genus gentiana) all at once. I have not been sick since, and also I seem to be able to lift cars. No, not really. But this stuff packs one intense and herbaceous punch!

Assorted Chocolate Mini-bars by Ritter Sport (60¢). Many customers have mentioned their love for this German brand of chocolate, so we’ve brought these in as our latest evil plot against you (wherein we place candy at the register and you can’t resist it). Flavors: milk chocolate, hazelnut, marzipan, nougat, yogurt, cornflakes (my favorite!), and butter cookie.

Snack attack.

Orange Oat Crisps by Gille ($3.79). These biscuits from Sweden are infused with orange flavor and drizzled with Belgian chocolate. We love the light, crispy texture.

Crème Brûlée Mix by Dr. Oetker ($2.99). For the lazy chef, we think this brand of dessert mixes from Canada offers the best quality. And, as it says in tantalizing script on the box, it comes “With Caramelizing Sugar.”

Licorice Cats by Dutch Sweets ($2.99). They’re a bit chewy, semi-hard, and shaped like a cat. Eating black cats: perhaps a holdover from our ancient pagan days?

Double Salt Licorice by Gustaf’s ($3.79). We’ve had many requests for this! I fancy myself a bold eater of extreme flavors, but these supremely salty coins of licorice are only for the die-hard fan.

Thank you, Norway!

Gjetost Cheese by Ski Queen ($6.99). This golden brown block of cheese from Norway is made from a blend of cow’s and goat’s milk. The milk is cooked until it caramelizes, giving it a nutty, mildly sweet flavor. We love the red packaging with its IKEA font. It’s best when sliced with a cheese plane and served with fruit and crispbread. It’s known as a skier’s snack in Norway; throw your own après-ski party and introduce your friends to this amazing cheese.

More of our favorite thing: Food en Tube!

Mayonnaise by Mills ($3.29). It’s mayo in a tube from Norway. From their website: “ideal for garnising (sic), enhacing (sic) the taste of sandwiches, dips and sauces, weather (sic) it be for everyday use or on special occations (sic).” Yes!

Pure Almond Paste by Odense ($7.49). Made with mostly almonds, along with sugar and glucose syrup, this brand of almond paste imported from Denmark is widely heralded as the best by the choosy denizens of the internet (we’re included in that category).

Thanks for reading, see you soon!
Rachel

and
Steve Winston and Sharon Baden
Owners, Paris Grocery

Paris Grocery News 2/20 Sunday, Feb 20 2011 

 

Good fonts on the outside, good chai on the inside.

Hot Drinks @ PG

This past Saturday, we were joined by Jillu Zaveri, founder of Seattle-based company Jaipur Avenue, for a chai tea tasting. Thanks to Jillu and her husband for spending time with us, and thanks to our customers for coming by. Lots of chai went out the door, and we’re looking forward to your feedback. Jaipur Avenue makes all-natural, just-add-water chai tea mixes; we sampled Original Masala (a perfect balance of spices), Saffron (exotically sweet), and Cardamon (earthy and fully spicy). These flavors, as well as Ginger and Vanilla, are now available at the shop. The packaging is particularly pretty, and fortunately the product inside lives up to the outside appearance. You may be asking yourself, why chai? Well, why not? It’s delicious, it’s local, we’re cold, it’s warm. Also, George insists that chai tea is all the rage in Paris (note: George has not been to Paris). While he may be making that up, it wouldn’t surprise me. Parisians, for all their sometimes stodgy (yet charming) reverence for their own culture, are a truly metropolitan and increasingly global bunch. And this will continue to be our explanation for the funny things we like to buy for the shop that aren’t strictly French, including Linghams Malaysian hot sauce, Les Moulins Mahjoubs Tunisian olive oil, Finnska Finnish licorice, and now Jaipur Avenue Indian-by-way-of-Seattle chai tea.

Wine @ PG

 

Cheap, cheap, not-as-cheap.

Two closeout deals on full-bodied, easy-drinking rosés, and Sharon’s new favorite red.

Abel Clement Rhone Rosé 2009 ($8.99)

Fresh and light on the palate, with notes of wild strawberry and a touch of spice. 80% Grenache and 20% Syrah. The perfect wine to enjoy during the ever-increasing daylight hours.

Mas Carlot Costières de Nîmes Rosé 2009 ($8.99)

A more fruit-forward style, with a good amount of body and a clean finish. Stands up to dishes with plenty of flavor and spice; try it with ratatouille or Mexican food. 60% Grenache and 40% Syrah.

Domaine Charvet Moulin-à-Vent “La Réserve d’Amélie” 2009 ($18.99)

Sharon tasted this by the glass at nearby Lecosho, and came back raving about it. It’s her new favorite wine (this week, at least). This is the only wine we carry from this up-and-coming cru of Beaujolais that produces very fine and full-bodied iterations of the Gamay grape. Juicy, dark fruits and a hint of earth.

Thanks for reading, see you soon!

Rachel

and
Steve Winston and Sharon Baden
Owners, Paris Grocery