Paris Grocery News 4/22 Saturday, Apr 23 2011 

A picture of an Easter window display taken by the bosses last year while vacationing in Burgundy. Chocolate creatures sort of blur the line between charming and creepy, don't you think?

Wine @ PG

For Easter (or just taking advantage of a lovely spring day) brunch, I recommend pink and/or bubbles. (Surprise, surprise.)

Pink and/or bubbly.

Jean Paul Trocadero Brut Rosé Vin de Savoie ($9.99)

A vivacious sparkling rosé. Fruit forward, tasting of strawberries and cherries, with immense effervescence, this wine combines the best qualities of rosés and sparklers. A great pick for bridal showers, deck parties, or just lounging on the “beach” (whatever strip of backyard, park, or mini-porch you call your own). Peppery and fun.

Domaine Balivet NV Bugey Cerdon Méthode Ancéstrale ($22.99)

Very fresh and zesty, this sparkling rosé from Savoie complements a varied brunch spread. It’s made in the same process as artisanal cider, meaning only one fermentation as opposed to two fermentations  (as is done with champagne and most crémants). 100-percent Gamay, it’s off-dry and unique, with flavors of cherry and ripe apple with a touch of sweetness. It has low alcohol (8-precent) and shows good minerality and acidity in the mouth, with fresh grape aromas in the nose. Really tasty and a pretty, delicate pink color in the glass.

2010 Pascal et Nicolas Reverdy “Terre de Maimbray” Sancerre Rosé ($24.99)

Sancerre is usually known for its chalky white wines. Pinot Noir also grows there, however, and the cool climate makes for elegant, lacy rosés that are mineral-driven. Located on steep hills, this family-run estate is thought to be one of the finest Sancerre producers in France. From old vine Pinot Noir, the wine is a lovely faded pink, with a perfumey, floral nose and strawberry and cherry on the palate. While cheap rosés from the Rhône and Provence are wonderful, if you’re a rosé lover, you owe it to yourself to try this exceptional rosé from the Loire.

Food @ PG

Last-minute brunch necessities.

Canterbury Naturals Crepe Mix ($4.99/14-oz.)

You asked for it, and now it’s here! Crepe Mix. Just add eggs and water. And nutella and berries (not really, that’s just my serving suggestion).

Comté de Fruitière ($4.25/quarter lb.)

The crowd-pleasingest cheese ever. This raw cow’s milk cheese from the Jura is aged 5-6 months. It offers a fruit nectar aroma and a more delicate nuttiness than more aged Comté. Almost sweet and bursting with flavors of fresh milk and butter. Great melted,  in salads, or with fruit.

D’Artagnan Duck Bacon ($9.99/8-oz.)

This stuff is insanely delicious. Regulars drop by on weekend mornings to grab a package, along with a bottle of sparkling, and it always gives me a serious case of brunch-envy (it’s a thing, look it up.) Made from Moulard duck, with no nitrates or nitrites or growth hormones or anything. A smoky and rich flavor, with a lean texture. Duck. Bacon. Yum.

There are so many things in this shop for brunch, it’s silly. Jams and honey and cheese accompaniments and olives and chocolates and on and on. We ought to rename ourselves the Brunch Store. Come by and see us for all your weekend snack attack needs!

Thanks for reading, see you soon!
Rachel

and
Steve Winston and Sharon Baden
Owners, Paris Grocery

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Paris Grocery News, 3/11 Friday, Mar 12 2010 

Among French appellations scrambling to sell wine during the recession, Bordeaux is perhaps the region struggling the hardest. Prices of older wines are being slashed as newer vintages are released, providing a great opportunity to load up on delicious bottles that were previously unaffordable. We’ve brought in four new red wines from the left bank, primarily Cabernet Sauvignon blends, which we think are steals.

2006 Domaine Lapalu “La Patache” Médoc ($14.99) A blend of 85% Cabernet Sauvignon harvested from different parcels of the Lapalu family’s vineyards, the fruit has been skillfully selected and blended. A lively, juicy Bordeaux that is approachable in its youth, it also has an ability to develop with age. It is deep ruby, aromatic with strong notes of cassis and plum supported by dusty tannins and softer notes of vanilla. Wonderful as an accompaniment to roasts, it is also delicious all on its own!

2006 Sorbey Haut-Médoc ($14.99) The second label of the prestigious Chateau Julien, Chateau Sorbey uses grapes from the same gravel vineyards to create outstandingly priced Médoc wine. This 50% Cabernet Sauvignon, 50% Merlot shows great minerality and balance. It spends at least a year maturing in oak barrels. Concentrated, nicely structured, with chewy black fruit and hints of spice and cedar. Delicious with lamb crusted in herbs and lavender.

2007 Chateau Semonlon Haut-Médoc ($15.99) Olivier Dumora inherited this small estate, which sits very close to Margaux, from his great-grandfather. The gravel and mud soil of the area is known for its finesse, and Dumora respects the terroir and pays homage to the traditional winemaking style of Bordeaux. All the fruit is harvested by hand and fermented in stainless steel tanks, followed by a year of aging in both cement vats and in oak barrels. The 35-year-old vines of Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot yield a supple wine with deep notes of black currant, plum, and earth. Medium-bodied with balanced acidity and tannins, it is very appealing now but can also be cellared for a couple of years.

2005 Château Bibian Listrac-Médoc ($24.99) Julien Meyre, winemaker at Chateau Bibian, stopped in at Paris Grocery last week with his wonderful wines. From clay and limestone vineyards with deep pockets of gravel, the 2005 vintage was the estate’s best bottling since 1990! 55% Merlot, 30% Cabernet Sauvignon and 15% Petit Verdot, it was kept 6 months in French oak. Full-bodied, it shows exceptional structure. The ripe black fruit is persistent, and balanced by notes of the terroir: graphite, pencil lead and chalk. Incredibly delicious and a great addition to your cellar. “Rich and layered, with blackberry, currant and toasty oak on the nose and palate. Full and silky-textured, with a long finish.” 90 points Wine Spectator

NEW CHEESES AND FOODS AT PARIS GROCERY

Soumaintrain – A cow’s milk cheese from Yonne in northern Burgundy, the wheels are washed with brine and marc de Bourgogne. Pungent, gooey, rich, mushroomy, and barnyardy- some even say it displays umami. Try it with a Chablis for a blissful experience. $25.99/wheel

Comté de Fruitière -A raw cow’s milk cheese from the Jura, aged 5-6 months. A delicious fruit nectar aroma and a more delicate nuttiness than more aged comté. Almost sweet and bursting with flavors of fresh milk and butter. Great in salads or with fruit! $16.99/lb

Tomme Haut Berry -From a remote and arid region of southwestern France, this sheep’s milk cheese has a firm yet creamy texture. An aroma of spring wildflowers and a bright flavor that is both sweet and acidic make this cheese a new favorite. $28.99/lb

Saint Nectaire Fermier -A fermier (farmstead) version of an ancient style of cheese. Made with the milk of Salers cows who graze on the volcanic pastures of Auvergne, this cheese has all the earthiness, nuttiness, and raw milk flavor a cheese can possess! Pair with a light, fruity Gamay.

Biscuits from Bretagne.

Tarbais Beans— the traditional bean for cassoulet! These unique beans are hand picked around the tiny village of Tarbais. Slim and thin skinned, they have a subtle flavor. Creamy without being paste-like, they are ideal for slow-baked dishes. $17.99/lb.

We now have the full line of Clément Faugier chestnut products— chestnut cream with vanilla, chestnut puree, and whole chestnuts in water. Traou Mad de Pont Aven cookies from Brittany– made with salted butter, these thick biscuits are supremely dunk-worthy!
And, Salted Black Licorice is now in stock!

Come see us soon!