Paris Grocery News 9/30 Friday, Oct 1 2010 

While she's certainly learning a valuable skill, I suggest: let's be our own Sally Drapers.

Cocktails @ PG

The few flavors of bitters that we carried in the shop were in such demand that we decided to bring in the complete line of bitters from Fee Brothers. We don’t think the fun-at-home-with-cocktails trend is going anywhere (not with la Niña on the loose again this winter), and we’ve got some great ideas for how to try these bitters in your cocktails, along with our fantastic vermouths, aperitif wines, and garnishes.

These guys know their bitters.

Try all 8 Flavors!

Old Fashioned

For use in Manhattans and Champagne Cocktails.

Orange

Try a “Classic” Martini (2 oz gin and 1/2 oz dry vermouth, dash of orange bitters).

Mint

For use in Mojitos and Mint Juleps.

Grapefruit

An excellent match in cocktails based with Cynar or Campari.

Cherry

Sweeter than the other flavors, this will deliver pure fruitiness to brandy-based cocktails.

Lemon

Promises to add a “snappy citrus taste with a hint of lemongrass” to drinks. Yum.

Cranberry

This newest flavor may take some experimentation. We think its tartness may be an excellent counterpoint to gin.

Rhubarb

The internet has turned up some interesting ideas; they apparently work in cocktails featuring tequila. Here’s one from Portland mixologist Jacob Grier’s blog, Liquidity Preference.

Mexican Martinez

2.25 oz reposado tequila (Chamucos)
1/2 oz Dolin Blanc vermouth
1 bar spoon maraschino
2 dashes Fee Brothers rhubarb bitters

Stir over ice, strain into a chilled cocktail glass, and garnish with a slice of orange zest.

And finally, try Fee Brothers Orgeat Syrup (pronounced Or-SHOT): For use in Mai-Tais and Momisettes.

Dolin Vermouths

Dolin Vermouth de Chambéry

The only Vermouth that has earned an AOC designation. Dolin has none of the cloying sweetness or overly bitter qualities found in bottom-shelf Vermouths. The particular mixture of plants found near Chambéry give a fresh, restrained, and elegant nose with a subtle, complex, and bittersweet palate. Excellent both as a mixer and as an apéritif. In Sweet, Dry, and Blanc. $13.99/each

Bonal

This aperitif wine is made from a base of Mistelle (partially fermented grape juice to which alcohol has been added) that is infused with quinine, gentian, and renowned herbs from the Grand Chartreuse Mountains. Try it on the rocks or to amp your classic Negroni cocktail.  $18.99/each

And don’t forget, a customer favorite:

Griottines

Famous throughout the world for their freshness and refined taste, these delicious Morello cherries have been pitted and prepared in a Kirsch liqueur. Add to desserts, aperitifs, and cocktails like the perfect Manhattan. We pack them out into 4-ounce containers so you get just the right amount.

Craves @ PG

Paysan Breton butter

I once enjoyed an extremely memorable dinner on a cold dark night in Brittany with an American, a Corsican, and our host, a Spaniard. Go figure. But our meal was very French and très Breton. Along with salmon and whiskey and individual tarts for dessert, the most life changing item on the table was a hunk of buttercup-yellow butter, chock full of crunchy sea salt crystals. We served it up on slice after slice of substantial loaf of rustic brown bread. This stuff slays me.

Feed Your Mind @ PG

Mini-Cocotte by Lissa Streeter

I don’t even know what more I need to say. Mini-cocottes could not be any cuter or more comforting. Recipes include Spinach Soufflés, Cherry Tomato Tatin, Cherry Raspberry Clafoutis, and Almond Milk Pudding.

Thanks for reading, see you soon!
Rachel

and
Steve Winston and Sharon Baden
Owners, Paris Grocery

Paris Grocery News 4/8 Thursday, Apr 8 2010 

One of our favorite parts of this job (besides the yummy free samples we get to take home) is advocating for misunderstood or overlooked products. It’s easy for things to get lost in translation or misrepresented when they leave their native home. Beaujolais wine is often dismissed outside of France, and we often are left wondering why. The Gamay grape flourishes in the mild climate and gravelly soil of the region, resulting in a delicious array of ethereal wines. Perhaps they are misunderstood it because their appeal lies in a certain subtlety and finesse, whereas wines produced and consumed in the States tend to be powerful and brash. Beaujolais’ lightness and grace, however, is what makes them ideal for pairing with food– they match well with fish and fowl alike, and elevate the flavors of sauces, stuffings, and side dishes. It is easy to mistake a dark color and heavy body for complexity, but Beaujolais’ brilliant rubies hold incredible length and a fusion of aromas and flavors that are earthy, floral, and fruity. With the weather turning slowly towards warmth and sunshine, it the perfect time to explore (or rediscover) these undervalued wines, especially since they are available for truly stellar prices!

C'est beau, le Beaujolais !

2009 Pierre Chermette Beaujolais Primeur ($14.99)

The ultimate food wine: this is not a soda pop-style Beaujolais! The Chermettes were among the pioneers of sustainable viticulture in the Beaujolais and their wines are made in a traditional way. Using natural yeasts and little or no fermentation, Chermette Beaujolais Primeur is a true expression of terroir. Unlike many Beaujolais Nouveaus, it improves with bottle age.

2007 Domaine Joseph Drouhin Beaujolais-Villages ($11.99)

Josh Reynolds said, “Fans of graceful, tangy, minerally Beaujolais will find plenty to like from both 2007 and 2008,” and this bottle is a fine example. The great-grandchildren of Joseph Drouhin still run the centuries-old winery. For their Beaujolais-Villages, the grapes are hand-harvested and some of them undergo carbonic fermentation. The resulting wine is graceful, with a refined, highly aromatic nose and silky tannins. Bright red berries, cherries, and peonies dominate, with the fresh fruit persisting on the finish. A convivial wine, ideal for dinners with Cornish hen and flavorful dishes, this wine is also a winner on its own.

2008 Terres Dorées Beaujolais “L’Ancien” ($16.99)

Domaine des Terres Dorées is located just north of Lyon, in the area known as “The Land of the Golden Stones.” The founder and winemaker, Jean-Paul Brun, is a relentless advocate for winemaking à l’ancienne. While Beaujolais has come to be associated with a “fruit candy” genre of winemaking, Brun makes old-style Gamay wines. He does not add sugars to his wine and uses only indigenous yeasts for his fermentation, instead of the lab-developed strain popular in the region for its banana and candy aromas. This Beaujolais is 100% old-vine Gamay, delicate and pure, showing excellent balance, freshness, and acidity. Mineral-driven, with bright cherry, cranberry, and sweet spices melding into a lengthy finesse. A remarkable value: consider it a poor man’s Burgundy!
90 points Wine Advocate

NEW CHEESES AND FOODS AT PARIS GROCERY

We are thrilled to be carrying two kinds of charcuterie from renowned charcuterie maker Creminelli. We can’t pick a favorite so you’ll have to try them both!

Salame Tartufo

This award-winning truffle salame is the perfect example of excess being just enough. The delicate aroma of truffles allows the full pork flavor to shine through. $9.25/ quarter lb

Wild Boar Salame

Made from wild boar meat and pork belly, this Creminelli salame is seasoned with wine-soaked cloves and juniper berries. Lean yet silky, with a full, distinctive flavor, it lends an exotic touch to your recipes and charcuterie platters. $10.75/ quarter lb

Now in Stock!

Fabrique Delices Cured Duck Salami, Gabietou (raw cow’s and sheep’s milk cheese), Boursin Cheese in Roasted Red Pepper and other flavors, Griottines (morello cherries in brandy), and Scharffen Berger Roasted Cocoa Nibs.