A taste of Morocco Wednesday, Jan 25 2012 

Paris Grocery News
January 25th, 2011

Have you missed us?We hope you all survived the great snow storm of 2012 and have been keeping warm. It’s certainly a time for hot food and good company. With the holidays past, I’ve had most of my ‘home favorites’ and am ready to branch out and try something new. It’s a new year, and time for explorations! This week, I headed to North Africa for inspiration and am attempting to cook a Chicken Bastilla

Warm, flakey pastry filled with the unorthodox but outstanding combination of chicken (traditionally pigeon but who has time to go pigeon trapping these days?), blanched almonds($7.99/lb), Moroccan spices, orange blossom water ($5.99) and powdered sugar. Warca, also known as Feuille de Brique ($4.29), is the secret to the puffed, airy layers that bring a lightness to the otherwise extremely rich, nutty and spicy dish. !

For lunch, pair the Bastilla with our new signature Paris Grocery Moroccan mint tea ~$2.00/16 oz

For dinner, pair it with the 2009 Alain Graillot Syrocco ‘Zenata’ $19.99

This 100% Syrah possesses lots of soft, jammy, berry fruit, licorice, pepper and meaty notes. Tasty, plump, and altogether hedonistic, this wine is ideal for drinking over the next several years.

Of course, we’ve got to rave about a few more wine at PG this week, as long as we’ve got your ear:

2010 Cercius Cotes du Rhone Vielles Vignes $15.99

“Wow, is this an exciting wine! A custom cuvee put together by importer Eric Solomon along with the brilliant oenologist Philippe Cambie and Costieres de Nimes’ up-and-coming superstar, Michel Gassier, this blend of 85% Grenache and 15% Syrah (and there are 5,000 cases for the US) comes from the 70- to 80-year-old Grenache vines on the plateau of Domazan to the south of Chateauneuf du Pape. This sensational wine tastes more like Chateauneuf du Pape than just about any Cotes du Rhone one is likely to find. It is also another example of what looks to be another great vintage emerging from the southern Rhone – 2010. This is one of the greatest Cotes du Rhones I have ever tasted – wonderfully intense, deep ruby with some purple tinges, with a stunning nose of black raspberry liqueur intermixed with sweet cherries, licorice, pepper and Provencal lavender. Round, generous, opulent and heady, this fabulously intense, hedonistic wine should be drunk over the next 3-4 years. Bravo!” 93 points Wine Advocate

Georges Duboef Macon-Villages Chardonnay 2009 $9.99

This 100% chardonnay from Burgundy is un-oaked, making it fresh and floral with a beautiful nose. bright fruits are balanced by almond and a minerality that carries the lengthy finish. It’s a real treat at this price.

 

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Thanks for reading, stay warm, and we’ll see you in the shop!

Ellen

and
Steve Winston and Sharon Baden
Owners, Paris Grocery

Recipe: Roasted Asparagus with Paški Sir Saturday, May 7 2011 

Awesome Croatian goodness.

Ok, maybe not much of a “recipe.” But this is our new favorite cheese, and this is perhaps the best showcase for it, especially since asparagus is now in season and sitting in pretty little rows up in the Market. From the island of Pag, off the coast of Croatia, this sheep’s milk cheese is a fantastic substitute for Parmesan or Pecorino, and possibly way more interesting. It’s dry and crystalline and nutty, with hints of sage and citrus. Paški Sir evokes a particular terroir; there’s just something a little funky and herbaceous and wild about it. Croatia: I want to go to there. $29.99/lb

Roasted Asparagus with Paški Sir

Buy some pretty asparagus. Go home and get that oven hot. Arrange the asparagus on a baking sheet. Olive oil, salt, pepper—you know what to do here. Roast it! Should take around 20 minutes. Take it out of the oven and put it on a nice plate. Some people like to drizzle some aged balsamic here (I just go with lemon). Now: Shave the Paški Sir over the spears, as much as you think is necessary. Try to get it nice and thin and ribbony—bigger bits that break off can be popped in your mouth. Now eat it!

Paris Grocery News 4/9 Saturday, Apr 9 2011 

Three new reds from smaller, up-and-coming appellations. (Hint: that means terrific wines for cheap.)

Wine @ PG

Georges Duboeuf  Morgon Jean Descombes 2009

Sorry to keep beating the “OMG vintage of a lifetime” drum regarding the 2009 Beaujolais vintage but: Here’s yet another delicious example at a pretty incredible price. We’re all really loving wines from Morgon lately, too. “Light tannins and a smoky mineral note frame this lush red, which displays layers of black cherry, raspberry ganache, and tea rose flavors. There’s a spicy thread running through the wine, leading to a fresh, firm finish. 93 points.”  —Wine Spectator ($14.99)

Domaine Les Aphillanthes Vin de Pays de Vaucluse 2009

This lovely and light-bodied red features a good mix of cherry, cherry pit, and red licorice notes with a juicy finish. Wines from the small area of Vaucluse (located in Provence, on the border of the Rhône) are smart little table wines; many top producers from border areas have been buying parcels of land there so they can have more freedom to experiment with other varietals or biodynamic techniques. This one’s refreshing enough to sip as an aperitif, but also stands up to a game day meal of roasted chicken and frites. 86 points Wine Spectator ($11.99)

Château de L’Estang Côtes de Castillon 2004

Jefe couldn’t believe the fantastic value that this Bordeaux presented; he bought a whole case (we have really smart wine reps). This blend of Merlot and Cabernet Franc comes from an up-and-coming appellation on the right bank of the Dordogne river east of Saint Emilion. Pleasing berry and mineral notes, and a price you can’t beat! ($9.99)

Food @ PG

Oh, Canada.

Just in from Nova Scotia: Wild Caught Boned Salted Cod ($15.99/1 lb box). Here’s a recipe for brandade that was originally printed in the New York Times for Passover.

Brandade de Morue

By Alex Witchel; adapted from Nicholas Lemann

Time: 40 minutes

Yield: About 3 cups.

1 whole head garlic

1 1/2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil, more as needed

2 Idaho or other starchy potatoes, peeled

1 pound boned dried salt cod, soaked according to package directions, or pre-soaked salt cod

1 onion, peeled and quartered

2 cups whole milk, or as needed

2 large eggs

Salt and freshly ground black pepper

1/4 cup finely chopped parsley

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Place garlic on a square of foil, rub with 1/2 tablespoon olive oil to coat it, and wrap securely in foil. Roast until cloves are soft, about 30 minutes. Allow to cool, remove cloves from their skins, then mash cloves with a fork.

2. While garlic roasts, prepare potatoes and cod: Place potatoes in a saucepan, cover with water, and boil until tender, about 20 minutes. Place cod in a saucepan, add onion, and barely cover with milk. Place over medium-low heat and simmer until cod flakes easily, 15 to 20 minutes. Remove cod with a slotted spoon, transferring it to a plate to cool; leave milk at a very low simmer.

3. Drain potatoes; remove onion from milk and discard. Return potatoes to pot and mash them. Immediately and quickly break eggs into hot potatoes and stir vigorously until fully incorporated. Beat in 2 or 3 tablespoons simmering milk until mixture is very thick and smooth. Add one tablespoon olive oil, or as desired, for flavor and texture. Add garlic (it may not all be needed) and salt and pepper to taste.

4. Shred cooled cod as finely as possible, and add to potato mixture. Adjust milk, oil, garlic and salt and pepper as desired. Add parsley and mix well. Mound in a shallow serving bowl or on a platter. Serve at room temperature with toasty baguette or peasant bread, if desired.

We’re now packing out olives to order from our deli case, so you can get just as much as you need.

Black Olives with Herbs

These oil-cured black olives with herbes de provence have a dense texture and a full, earthy flavor. So savory—I think they’re the perfect olive to have with aperitifs.

French Country Olive Mix

A colorful blend of green, pink, and black olives, as well as lupini beans and bell peppers, are tossed in a lively marinade of spices, pepper, and vinegar. Perfect alongside antipasto plates and a cold Belgian beer!

Thanks for reading, see you soon!
Rachel

and
Steve Winston and Sharon Baden
Owners, Paris Grocery

Recipe: Hearts of Palm Fries with Chipotle Mayo Saturday, Feb 26 2011 

More versatile than you may think!

We’ve loved hearts of palm in salads (my favorite: hearts of palm, fennel, and grape tomatoes) and pureed in soups. But as we saw in the March issue of Saveur, chef Julian Medina of Yerba Buena in Manhattan had the wisdom to coat them with panko breadcrumbs and fry them in canola oil with a side of spicy mayo. Drop by to grab a jar of Miguel & Valentino hearts of palm ($5.49) and get frying!

Recipe: Hearts of Palm Fries with Chipotle Mayo